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  • "SHOCKING" ICE Internal Mandates "BEWARE CSS/LULAC"

    Joan Friedland, immigration policy director at the National Immigration Law Center, countered that quotas will encourage agents to target easy cases, not the ones who pose the greatest safety risk.

    From: DRO Taskings
    Sent: Monday, February 22, 2010 8:05 AM
    Subject: Removal Goals
    The following message is sent on behalf of James M. Chaparro, Director:
    To: Field Office Directors and Deputy Field Office Directors:
    Through your efforts, ICE has removed 56, 853 criminal aliens as of February 15, 2010. With every field office maintaining this level of activity we anticipate achieving the Agency goal of 150,000 criminal alien removals in FY10.

    DRO must now look at the other critical Agency goal of achieving 400,000 removals and returns
    overall without relaxing our increased efforts in criminal removals.
    Non-criminal Removals are Falling Short of our Goal
    Current non-criminal removal projections put is well short of our FY10 goal. As of February 15,
    2010, DRO removed or returned 60,397 non-criminal aliens which is an average of 437
    removals/returns per day. The current non-criminal removal rate projections will result in
    159,740 removals at the close of the fiscal year. Coupling this with the projections in criminal
    removals only gives us a total of just over 310,000 overall removals -- well under the Agency's
    goal of 400,000.
    Here is What I Need You to Do
    There a number of activities that DRO will take to increase our overall removals and move us
    into position to meet or exceed the fiscal year goals.
    • Within 30 days we will increase our national ADP by 3,000 bringing our national overall
    ADP to approximately 32,600. This will require each and every field office to maximize
    the use of the funded beds in your field office or the reallocation of funds from those field
    offices that maximized this as much as possible to those with detention needs that are in
    excess of the funding currently available to them. This increase in overall ADP alone has
    the potential to provide DRO with an additional 21,000 removals during the remainder of
    the fiscal year, but we must move quickly to raise the ADP.
    • CAP surges will be planned and implemented in every field office over the course of the
    fiscal year. I ask you to coordinate with prison systems to identify all aliens that are
    scheduled to be released within 90-120 days and begin travel document processing and
    coordination. The sooner we do this in the fiscal year, the more comfortable I will be that
    we can reach our goals.
    • For those with Rapid REPAT agreements, work closely with corrections officials to
    increase identifications of eligible participants and expedite removal. For those without
    agreements, reengage State correction officials to develop a program if possible.
    • Increase the number of Tier One Non-Criminal Fugitive alien arrests along with Tier
    Two arrests (Re-Entry/Reinstatement) in every field office. An example would be 30-60
    day Tier One/Tier Two Non-Criminal surge operations.
    • Maximize our participation in the 2010 Mexican Interior Repatriation Program (MIRP),
    which may generate approximately 18,000 — 24,000 returns over the course of the FY
    2010 program.
    Being successful in meeting these two broad goals will require every Field Office and each Field
    Office Director to fully support these initiatives and to look at individual initiatives within their
    field office that could increase our effectiveness. Our program is challenged this year in many
    areas including both budget and staffing. Our case and detention management activities are
    important in both detained and non-detained but we understand that field offices may see a need
    to temporarily shift staffing resources from one to the other in order to maximize our
    effectiveness at maintaining our criminal removal activities as they are today while increasing
    the overall removals in each field office.
    These Efforts Must Be Sustained and Will be Closely Monitored
    This will be a key topic in our next Field Office Director's teleconference and I will ensure that
    we are reporting out to you where we are in our overall progress on these teleconferences during
    the remainder of the fiscal year. In addition, I will encourage you to raise opportunities that
    might benefit others or impediments or obstacles that I or the staff here in HQ can work to
    mitigate in order to increase your successes and effectiveness.
    I thank you for your continued hard work and patience as we have worked to define our standing
    in these goal areas. We have a tremendously energetic and tenacious workforce in DRO and I
    am confident that we will rise to the challenge and meet our goals.
    U.S. Immigration
    and Customs
    Enforcement
    FROM:
    on and Deportation Officer
    Office of Detention and Removal Operations
    U.S. Department of Homeland Security
    Dallas Field Office
    8101 N. Stemmons Freeway
    Dallas, TX 75247
    January 4, 2010
    MEMORANDUM FOR:
    Immigration Enforcement Agent
    SUBJECT: erformance Appraisal Element #2
    This memorandum serves to clarify the requirements and expectations of GS-5 and GS-7
    Immigration Enforcement Agents as they relate to Element 2 — Institutional Removal Program
    (IRP) and Alien Criminal Apprehension Program (ACAP) in your Performance Work Plan
    (PWP) served on January 4, 2010.
    Element #2 will be evaluated as follows:
    GS-7
    30 cases per month and below-
    31-40 cases per month-
    41-45 cases per month-
    46 + cases per month-
    GS-5
    24 cases per month and below-
    25-35 cases per month-
    36-39 cases per month-
    40 + cases per month-
    Unacceptable
    Minimally Successful
    Fully Successful
    Excellent
    Unacceptable
    Minimally Successful
    Fully Successful
    Excellent
    WWW. ice .gov
    EMPLOYEE: 41111111111110110 PAGE NO. 3
    PART I - PERFORMANCE WORK PLAN (PWP)
    A. JOB ELEMENT NUMBER AND TITLE (CHECK ONE: Critical q Non-critical and indicate Weighting, if Appropriate)
    Element # 2 —Criminal Alien Program (CAP)
    B. PERFORMANCE STANDARD(S):
    The Agent periodically visits local, municipal and state law enforcement holding and correctional facilities, courts, parole
    and probation offices, and state and federal prisons, and identifies violators of Immigration and Nationality laws and
    regulations who are subject to removal. The Agent conducts personal interviews and questioning of aliens and others,
    reviews documents and files, to establish the alienage and removability of these individuals and coordinates with the
    Office of Chief Counsel in appropriate cases. The Agent assists other law enforcement agencies and personnel in
    identifying criminal aliens in their custody. The Agent prepares the required documents to initiate removal proceedings,
    and arrests and processes for removal aliens encountered that are not authorized to be in or work in the United States.
    The Agent completes extensive database inquiries (e.g.) IAFIS, IBIS, NCIC, (DENT, etc.) to 'determine criminal history.
    and/or any links to terrorist activities, interprets this information using a thorough knowledge of immigration law and
    prepares any necessary charging documents (this may require obtaining Judgment and Conviction records to support
    criminal charges).
    ELEMENT IS EVALUATED AS FOLLOWS:
    Excellent when:
    In addition to meeting the Fully Successful level, the Immigration Enforcement Agent demonstrates initiative and requires
    minimal supervisory guidance in the management of his/her assigned caseload. The LEA averages 51 or more processed
    cases per month with all cases completed timely with no noted deficiencies in casework **
    Fully Successful when:
    The Immigration Enforcement Agent demonstrates the capacity to work independently but requires occasional guidance
    relating to the management of his/her assigned caseload. In addition, the agent averages 46 to 50 processed cases per
    month with no more than 10 cases per rating year processed untimely due to the agent's inattentiveness to their caseload.
    The agent usually submits casework that is error free and is processed in accordance with regulations and consistent with
    outstanding instructions. **
    Minimally Successful when:
    The Immigration Enforcement Agent requires supervisory guidance on a regular basis as he/she cannot or will not utilize
    initiative or otherwise work independently relating to the management of his/her assigned caseload. In addition, the LEA
    averages 36 to 45 processed cases per month with many cases processed outside of established timeframes due to the
    agent's inattentiveness to their caseload. The agent frequently submits casework that is error prone and/or processed
    untimely. **
    NOTE: ** The term "timely" is intended to reflect a reasonable period of time and will vary according to personnel staffing and work load.
    NOTE: A deficiency, complaint, or inadequacy is defined as a significant error adversely affecting the job element. It will usually result in
    counseling by a Supervisor. Minor errors are not usually considered a deficiency, complaint, or inadequacy, however, continued minor
    deficiencies, complaints, or inadequacies may be considered as significant in the aggregate. Deficiencies, complaints, or inadequacies of a
    very serious nature may be weighted as more than one when justified and so supported by a Supervisor. Leave and other approved absences
    will be taken under consideration when determining an evaluation for this element.
    ** In addition to the noted standards of the performance element, receptiveness, willingness, cooperation and attitude will be given due
    consideration during the rating period.
    From:
    Sent: Frida November 20 2009 4:52 PM
    To:
    Cc:
    Subject: FW: Productivity
    Importance: High
    Attn SC personnel,
    As you know, next week we are scheduled to begin to provide LEA support to local counties and to
    ensure we are successful with that venture, we need to tighten the ropes on our current program.
    • Effective Friday, November 20 th , employees are expected to produce a minimum of 3 actual
    Charging Documents Issued (CDI) daily in addition to completing other DEPORT tasks (i.e. Detainers,
    Case Updated and No Action for BOP & CIS cases). If a member of the staff is unable to conform to this
    standard, you will need to provide an explanation to your shift supervisor.
    • Since we are not currently overwhelmed with an abundance of inquiries, beginning today,
    employees assigned to monitor the terminals are required to complete other DEPORT tasks during
    downtime. If this change and we begin receiving numerous IAQs, we can revisit this topic.
    • All employees assigned to DEPORT/SC are required to gain access to the various databases and
    systems needed to complete their duties and assignments no later than COB Tuesday, November 24th.
    We went live on November 8th and it is extremely difficult to comprehend and believe that there are
    employees without full system access. If everyone is not in full compliance by this deadline, a detailed
    explanation is required to your shift/acting supervisor
    • Employees who require access to the databases and systems can accelerate the rocess b
    contactin their desi nated SCO and DHS Help Desk. As of today's date,
    are the SCOs. As Law Enforcement Officers (LEDs), we are equally
    responsible for obtaining and maintaining your systems access.
    • All shifts are expected to be equally productive barring unique and beyond our control situations
    (system failures, electrical outages, etc). Management will be checking your progress on a daily basis to
    ensure compliance and consistency. Daily reports are to be submitted prior to the end of your work day
    on the share drive logs.
    If there are questions and or concerns, feel free to contact me or your shift supervisor.
    Thank You,
    , SDDO
    312 office
    312 cell
    Nextel

  • #2
    Joan Friedland, immigration policy director at the National Immigration Law Center, countered that quotas will encourage agents to target easy cases, not the ones who pose the greatest safety risk.

    From: DRO Taskings
    Sent: Monday, February 22, 2010 8:05 AM
    Subject: Removal Goals
    The following message is sent on behalf of James M. Chaparro, Director:
    To: Field Office Directors and Deputy Field Office Directors:
    Through your efforts, ICE has removed 56, 853 criminal aliens as of February 15, 2010. With every field office maintaining this level of activity we anticipate achieving the Agency goal of 150,000 criminal alien removals in FY10.

    DRO must now look at the other critical Agency goal of achieving 400,000 removals and returns
    overall without relaxing our increased efforts in criminal removals.
    Non-criminal Removals are Falling Short of our Goal
    Current non-criminal removal projections put is well short of our FY10 goal. As of February 15,
    2010, DRO removed or returned 60,397 non-criminal aliens which is an average of 437
    removals/returns per day. The current non-criminal removal rate projections will result in
    159,740 removals at the close of the fiscal year. Coupling this with the projections in criminal
    removals only gives us a total of just over 310,000 overall removals -- well under the Agency's
    goal of 400,000.
    Here is What I Need You to Do
    There a number of activities that DRO will take to increase our overall removals and move us
    into position to meet or exceed the fiscal year goals.
    • Within 30 days we will increase our national ADP by 3,000 bringing our national overall
    ADP to approximately 32,600. This will require each and every field office to maximize
    the use of the funded beds in your field office or the reallocation of funds from those field
    offices that maximized this as much as possible to those with detention needs that are in
    excess of the funding currently available to them. This increase in overall ADP alone has
    the potential to provide DRO with an additional 21,000 removals during the remainder of
    the fiscal year, but we must move quickly to raise the ADP.
    • CAP surges will be planned and implemented in every field office over the course of the
    fiscal year. I ask you to coordinate with prison systems to identify all aliens that are
    scheduled to be released within 90-120 days and begin travel document processing and
    coordination. The sooner we do this in the fiscal year, the more comfortable I will be that
    we can reach our goals.
    • For those with Rapid REPAT agreements, work closely with corrections officials to
    increase identifications of eligible participants and expedite removal. For those without
    agreements, reengage State correction officials to develop a program if possible.
    • Increase the number of Tier One Non-Criminal Fugitive alien arrests along with Tier
    Two arrests (Re-Entry/Reinstatement) in every field office. An example would be 30-60
    day Tier One/Tier Two Non-Criminal surge operations.
    • Maximize our participation in the 2010 Mexican Interior Repatriation Program (MIRP),
    which may generate approximately 18,000 — 24,000 returns over the course of the FY
    2010 program.
    Being successful in meeting these two broad goals will require every Field Office and each Field
    Office Director to fully support these initiatives and to look at individual initiatives within their
    field office that could increase our effectiveness. Our program is challenged this year in many
    areas including both budget and staffing. Our case and detention management activities are
    important in both detained and non-detained but we understand that field offices may see a need
    to temporarily shift staffing resources from one to the other in order to maximize our
    effectiveness at maintaining our criminal removal activities as they are today while increasing
    the overall removals in each field office.
    These Efforts Must Be Sustained and Will be Closely Monitored
    This will be a key topic in our next Field Office Director's teleconference and I will ensure that
    we are reporting out to you where we are in our overall progress on these teleconferences during
    the remainder of the fiscal year. In addition, I will encourage you to raise opportunities that
    might benefit others or impediments or obstacles that I or the staff here in HQ can work to
    mitigate in order to increase your successes and effectiveness.
    I thank you for your continued hard work and patience as we have worked to define our standing
    in these goal areas. We have a tremendously energetic and tenacious workforce in DRO and I
    am confident that we will rise to the challenge and meet our goals.
    U.S. Immigration
    and Customs
    Enforcement
    FROM:
    on and Deportation Officer
    Office of Detention and Removal Operations
    U.S. Department of Homeland Security
    Dallas Field Office
    8101 N. Stemmons Freeway
    Dallas, TX 75247
    January 4, 2010
    MEMORANDUM FOR:
    Immigration Enforcement Agent
    SUBJECT: erformance Appraisal Element #2
    This memorandum serves to clarify the requirements and expectations of GS-5 and GS-7
    Immigration Enforcement Agents as they relate to Element 2 — Institutional Removal Program
    (IRP) and Alien Criminal Apprehension Program (ACAP) in your Performance Work Plan
    (PWP) served on January 4, 2010.
    Element #2 will be evaluated as follows:
    GS-7
    30 cases per month and below-
    31-40 cases per month-
    41-45 cases per month-
    46 + cases per month-
    GS-5
    24 cases per month and below-
    25-35 cases per month-
    36-39 cases per month-
    40 + cases per month-
    Unacceptable
    Minimally Successful
    Fully Successful
    Excellent
    Unacceptable
    Minimally Successful
    Fully Successful
    Excellent
    WWW. ice .gov
    EMPLOYEE: 41111111111110110 PAGE NO. 3
    PART I - PERFORMANCE WORK PLAN (PWP)
    A. JOB ELEMENT NUMBER AND TITLE (CHECK ONE: Critical q Non-critical and indicate Weighting, if Appropriate)
    Element # 2 —Criminal Alien Program (CAP)
    B. PERFORMANCE STANDARD(S):
    The Agent periodically visits local, municipal and state law enforcement holding and correctional facilities, courts, parole
    and probation offices, and state and federal prisons, and identifies violators of Immigration and Nationality laws and
    regulations who are subject to removal. The Agent conducts personal interviews and questioning of aliens and others,
    reviews documents and files, to establish the alienage and removability of these individuals and coordinates with the
    Office of Chief Counsel in appropriate cases. The Agent assists other law enforcement agencies and personnel in
    identifying criminal aliens in their custody. The Agent prepares the required documents to initiate removal proceedings,
    and arrests and processes for removal aliens encountered that are not authorized to be in or work in the United States.
    The Agent completes extensive database inquiries (e.g.) IAFIS, IBIS, NCIC, (DENT, etc.) to 'determine criminal history.
    and/or any links to terrorist activities, interprets this information using a thorough knowledge of immigration law and
    prepares any necessary charging documents (this may require obtaining Judgment and Conviction records to support
    criminal charges).
    ELEMENT IS EVALUATED AS FOLLOWS:
    Excellent when:
    In addition to meeting the Fully Successful level, the Immigration Enforcement Agent demonstrates initiative and requires
    minimal supervisory guidance in the management of his/her assigned caseload. The LEA averages 51 or more processed
    cases per month with all cases completed timely with no noted deficiencies in casework **
    Fully Successful when:
    The Immigration Enforcement Agent demonstrates the capacity to work independently but requires occasional guidance
    relating to the management of his/her assigned caseload. In addition, the agent averages 46 to 50 processed cases per
    month with no more than 10 cases per rating year processed untimely due to the agent's inattentiveness to their caseload.
    The agent usually submits casework that is error free and is processed in accordance with regulations and consistent with
    outstanding instructions. **
    Minimally Successful when:
    The Immigration Enforcement Agent requires supervisory guidance on a regular basis as he/she cannot or will not utilize
    initiative or otherwise work independently relating to the management of his/her assigned caseload. In addition, the LEA
    averages 36 to 45 processed cases per month with many cases processed outside of established timeframes due to the
    agent's inattentiveness to their caseload. The agent frequently submits casework that is error prone and/or processed
    untimely. **
    NOTE: ** The term "timely" is intended to reflect a reasonable period of time and will vary according to personnel staffing and work load.
    NOTE: A deficiency, complaint, or inadequacy is defined as a significant error adversely affecting the job element. It will usually result in
    counseling by a Supervisor. Minor errors are not usually considered a deficiency, complaint, or inadequacy, however, continued minor
    deficiencies, complaints, or inadequacies may be considered as significant in the aggregate. Deficiencies, complaints, or inadequacies of a
    very serious nature may be weighted as more than one when justified and so supported by a Supervisor. Leave and other approved absences
    will be taken under consideration when determining an evaluation for this element.
    ** In addition to the noted standards of the performance element, receptiveness, willingness, cooperation and attitude will be given due
    consideration during the rating period.
    From:
    Sent: Frida November 20 2009 4:52 PM
    To:
    Cc:
    Subject: FW: Productivity
    Importance: High
    Attn SC personnel,
    As you know, next week we are scheduled to begin to provide LEA support to local counties and to
    ensure we are successful with that venture, we need to tighten the ropes on our current program.
    • Effective Friday, November 20 th , employees are expected to produce a minimum of 3 actual
    Charging Documents Issued (CDI) daily in addition to completing other DEPORT tasks (i.e. Detainers,
    Case Updated and No Action for BOP & CIS cases). If a member of the staff is unable to conform to this
    standard, you will need to provide an explanation to your shift supervisor.
    • Since we are not currently overwhelmed with an abundance of inquiries, beginning today,
    employees assigned to monitor the terminals are required to complete other DEPORT tasks during
    downtime. If this change and we begin receiving numerous IAQs, we can revisit this topic.
    • All employees assigned to DEPORT/SC are required to gain access to the various databases and
    systems needed to complete their duties and assignments no later than COB Tuesday, November 24th.
    We went live on November 8th and it is extremely difficult to comprehend and believe that there are
    employees without full system access. If everyone is not in full compliance by this deadline, a detailed
    explanation is required to your shift/acting supervisor
    • Employees who require access to the databases and systems can accelerate the rocess b
    contactin their desi nated SCO and DHS Help Desk. As of today's date,
    are the SCOs. As Law Enforcement Officers (LEDs), we are equally
    responsible for obtaining and maintaining your systems access.
    • All shifts are expected to be equally productive barring unique and beyond our control situations
    (system failures, electrical outages, etc). Management will be checking your progress on a daily basis to
    ensure compliance and consistency. Daily reports are to be submitted prior to the end of your work day
    on the share drive logs.
    If there are questions and or concerns, feel free to contact me or your shift supervisor.
    Thank You,
    , SDDO
    312 office
    312 cell
    Nextel

    Comment


    • #3
      I think CSS/LULAC cases are not deportable ...COURT settlement was that way.. isn't it? Plz advice..

      Comment


      • #4
        Sorry, looks like they got your number.

        Comment


        • #5
          zamzam tht's true. That's why noone has been deported even if they have lost their status long time ago. But without status wht can u do, NOTHING.... Hope some CIR bill comes up soon and we all get rid of this frustrating situation. May God bless us all.

          Comment


          • #6
            <BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">I think CSS/LULAC cases are not deportable ...COURT settlement was that way.. isn't it? Plz advice.. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

            WRONG!!!! Some have been deported, and many more will be soon. These new quotas guarantee this as a fact.

            Never forget CSS/Newman/LULAC/Life applicants are the very easiest targets. The USCIS knows everything about these people, and have their finger prints.

            Read the OP again!!! I don't think you're getting it.

            Comment


            • #7
              Sounds rather like it is true. They will always go for the easiest targets first as Unique says. I wouldn't put much faith in the original settlement not to deport CSS/LULAC cases. They can always overturn that through the legal system. CIR is the only hope and I wouldn't hold your breath on that. A sad situation.
              "What you see in the photograph isn't what you saw at the time. The real skill of photography is organized visual lying."

              Comment


              • #8
                I wouldn't think it to be so easy to get someone sign a paper of voluntary deportation after 20 plus years of litigation to avoid it.

                But it is obvious that with deportable population in excess of 12 million individuals someone has to be deported.

                Heh, that's like reverse lottery, unluckiest get picked first
                http://www.anbsoft.com/images/usflag_med.jpg

                "...I contemplate with sovereign reverence that act of the whole American people which declared that their legislature should 'make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibit

                Comment


                • #9
                  <BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">I wouldn't think it to be so easy to get someone sign a paper of voluntary deportation after 20 plus years of litigation to avoid it. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

                  I disagree, it’s quite easy. If arrested ICE can hold any out of status alien for up to 180 days before putting them before a judge. Bail for immigration cases is different than bail for criminals. In criminal cases (unless special circumstances) a bail bond can be put up for 10% of the bail amount. In immigration cases 100% of the bail must be put up, and is not returned until the alien is either out of the Country, or has his/her status adjusted. Therefore if the bail is set at say $100,000 it must be paid in full before you can get out of detention, and is not returned possibly ever.

                  Augment that with the appalling conditions in the detention center, and you’ll have anybody begging for voluntary departure.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Not necessarily.

                    US has one of the best jails in the world Free food & medical care. In fact, life in US jails is much better than in most of the countries those "undesirables" are coming from.


                    You might be surprised to find out how many prefer to spend the years in it than sign voluntary departure papers.

                    As to the bail, since most immigration violators are not reputed hit men or high ranked mafia bosses , the bail amount of anything near $100.000 is almost unheard of.
                    $5000 to $20000 is more probable, provided the defendant is a flight risk! If not, one may not be placed behind bars ,for the duration of proceedings, at all (or else why LULAC/CSS people aren't in jail already?).

                    Add to it the fact that these people were litigating with INS for over 20 years to stay here and didn't chose to go. What would make them go now?


                    No, unique, you are a silly man.

                    Not only LULAC/CSS won't be facing speedy en mass deportation anytime soon, but the irony of circumstances is such that nobody really desire them all illegals to go.

                    However, the funds are allocated and spent to remove certain number of aliens, and with big money comes accountability.

                    So, obviosuly someone has to get deported (and will) and this is just another numbers game.

                    P.S. CSS/LULAC don't visit forums and don't spend much time reading news. They probably don't even know about this newest memo.

                    You are a very silly man, unique. When US really wants them illegals go it will make them go and you won't even know how it will come to pass.
                    http://www.anbsoft.com/images/usflag_med.jpg

                    "...I contemplate with sovereign reverence that act of the whole American people which declared that their legislature should 'make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibit

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      <BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">US has one of the best jails in the world Free food & medical care. In fact, life in US jails is much better than in most of the countries those "undesirables" are coming from.

                      You might be surprised to find out how many prefer to spend the years in it than sign voluntary departure papers. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

                      Yeah Right!!!

                      Post 9-11 Detention in Focus: Conditions in Detention

                      In places like Passaic County Jail, the jail, the dormitories where INS prisoners were being held is far over capacity. The use of triple bunks for detainees became a regular habit. This overcrowding is good for no one in the facility, including INS prisoners. The jail as a whole is completely dirty and unhygienic. Detainees that we work with whom have been held in other facilities in New Jersey say that Passaic is one of the worst.
                      INS prisoners, especially Post-911 INS prisoners in Passaic County Jail, are often harassed by the guards because of their race, religion, and immigration status. Religious practices and religious dietary habits are still not followed and respected by Passaic County Jail. Sheriff Speziale responded to this on Martin Luther King day by stating that this was a jail not a hotel.

                      There have been reports of beating of INS prisoners. Furthermore, Passaic County jail has used police dogs to transfer INS prisoners to different parts of the jail. Sometimes these dogs are used to threaten or scare the INS prisoners. Shortly after the Stop the Disappearances Campaign’s MLK day rally; Passaic County Jail curbed the use of dogs for a few months. However more recently, the dogs have returned.

                      INS prisoners waiting to go to court are transferred to the bullpen early in the morning before going to court. In some cases, people that were not called to court were kept in the bullpen for more than 10 hours

                      INS prisoners with health problems have generally complained of poor attention to their health needs. There are individuals that have heart problems and high blood pressure whose requests for medical treatment have been ignored by both the INS and the jail. Furthermore the overcrowded and dirty conditions of detention are exacerbating health problems for people. Detainees are rarely taken out for fresh air, some rarely see direct sunlight, rarely get exercise, and often cannot afford the clothes sold in the jail to keep them warm. Families are no longer allowed to give clothes to their loved ones inside.

                      There was recently a fire at Passaic County Jail. News reports had stated that all prisoners were evacuated from the jail. The detainees we are in contact with have said that they were not evacuated.

                      The conditions of detention are so bad that many people frequently want to go on hunger strike. When they do go on hunger strike they are intimidated more by the jail officials.

                      There is a culture of violence and intimidation in the jail in which tensions are flared between the INS Detainees and the General population. This culture is NOT discouraged by the jail staff. INS detainees are often transferred in and out of General Population arbitrarily and sometimes punitively. When they are transferred out of General Population to their own floor they are often ignored by the jail officials, when they are transferred into the jails General population they are often intimidated or harassed as the staff often looks on. This is not a blanket condemnation of the general population of the jail and it must be stressed that the general population of the jail also suffers from overcrowding and bad conditions.

                      Detainees are often arbitrarily transferred from one jail to another without informing the family or the attorney. Low-income families that have taken time off of work to visit their families come to New Jersey jails only to hear that their relative has been transferred.

                      The locations of people detained by the INS are often far away from their families, making it a financial nightmare to visit their loved ones. Furthermore, the jails/detention centers are often in far away localities in which the elected officials and administrators are inaccessible and unaccountable to the family members of those held in their jails.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Not to mention the number of detainees that have died while in detention...

                        DHS Admits It Failed to Disclose 11 More Deaths at Immigration Facilities

                        In response to a lawsuit brought by the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU), the U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS) revealed yesterday that the government had failed to disclose 11 more deaths in immigration detention facilities.

                        In April, DHS officials released what they called a comprehensive list of all deaths in detention. That list included a total of 90 individuals. With yesterday’s announcement, the government has now admitted to a total of 104 in-custody deaths since fiscal year 2003.

                        Pubrecord.org
                        "What you see in the photograph isn't what you saw at the time. The real skill of photography is organized visual lying."

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                        • #13
                          114 deaths out of over 12 million population? Are you kidding?
                          Those INS people must be soft hearted girlies, man!

                          Do the math : only 1 out of 105000 illegals died while in custody.

                          Why didn't they drop hundreds , nay thousands more from helicopters & airplanes while in transportation over middle of the desert? Who would ever notice or find out?

                          Doesn't it tell you something?
                          Seems like life in jail is a lot safer than outside of it ! Just look at statistics here. Not to mention where they came from....

                          May be illegals should march and collectively demand for immediate detention & lenghty jail sentences.

                          Free food, free lodging, free medicals, free cable tv, excersise machines and etc.
                          Stay there, do no work, enjoy life while your case is going through the court system (hopefully another 20 years for CSS/LULAC). You can even get college credits and get your degree for free while in prison, did you know that?

                          Free food, free medicals, free lodging, free gym and free education.
                          What more those illegals can wish for? Paradise !
                          http://www.anbsoft.com/images/usflag_med.jpg

                          "...I contemplate with sovereign reverence that act of the whole American people which declared that their legislature should 'make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibit

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                          • #14
                            You folks might find this interesting. It starts off a bit slow, but will knock your socks off.

                            ICE Agents Impersonate Immigration Attorneys

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                            • #15
                              so really...who gives an abercrumbly? Most of these cases are fraudulent...full of lies and baloney....good riddance. 12M illegals need to be deported....soon...who needs 'em?

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