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Senator Dianne Feinstein to Introduce Orange Card Program Amendment

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  • Senator Dianne Feinstein to Introduce Orange Card Program Amendment

    Senator Dianne Feinstein to Introduce Orange Card Program Amendment

    Prepared on May 19, 2006

    What is the Orange Card program?

    The Feinstein Orange Card amendment replaces the three-tiered treatment of undocumented immigrants in S. 2611 (the bill now being considered by the senate) with one simple process that applies to undocumented immigrants who lived in the U.S. on 1/1/06 and meet certain other requirements.

    Requirements for Orange Card

    The requirements to get an Orange Card are as follows:

    Undocumented on 1/1/06
    Physically present in the U.S. on or before 1/1/06
    If over 18, employed or in school on 1/1/06
    Paid taxes
    Speak English
    Have an understanding of American Civics
    Pass criminal and security background checks
    Registered for the selective service if required
    Pay $2,000 fine
    The spouse and children of Orange Card holders may also qualify.

    Requirements during waiting period

    Orange Card holders may become lawful permanent residents when all current applicants for green cards have received them (estimated to be 6 years), or eight years after the bill becomes law, whichever is earlier.

    Orange Card holders must check in each year with the government and show that they continue to meet all of the requirements listed above.

    Requirements for permanent Green Card

    After the 6-8 year waiting period, Orange Card holders may qualify for a permanent green card, if they meet the following requirements:

    Continue to meet all of the requirements to get an Orange Card
    If over 18, worked or attended school for at least 6 years
    What are the advantages of the Orange Card program?

    One simple process to legalize qualifying undocumented immigrants who entered the U.S. before 1/1/06.
    Does not leave out millions of undocumented immigrants who live in the U.S. and contribute to the economy, as does the current version of S. 2611
    Treats all family members equally
    Much easier to administer, so less fraud and fewer problems
    For 2-5 year immigrants:
    No requirement to leave the U.S. and come back
    No guestworker requirement
    No waiver of right to appeal
    Same waiting period as others
    If you believe this amendment is an improvement on the bill as written, Monday is the day to call your Senator and say so. (Capitol switchboard: 202-224-3121.) If not, tell me why not. This is a hugely important issue, and I hope everyone will let fly.

  • #2
    Senator Dianne Feinstein to Introduce Orange Card Program Amendment

    Prepared on May 19, 2006

    What is the Orange Card program?

    The Feinstein Orange Card amendment replaces the three-tiered treatment of undocumented immigrants in S. 2611 (the bill now being considered by the senate) with one simple process that applies to undocumented immigrants who lived in the U.S. on 1/1/06 and meet certain other requirements.

    Requirements for Orange Card

    The requirements to get an Orange Card are as follows:

    Undocumented on 1/1/06
    Physically present in the U.S. on or before 1/1/06
    If over 18, employed or in school on 1/1/06
    Paid taxes
    Speak English
    Have an understanding of American Civics
    Pass criminal and security background checks
    Registered for the selective service if required
    Pay $2,000 fine
    The spouse and children of Orange Card holders may also qualify.

    Requirements during waiting period

    Orange Card holders may become lawful permanent residents when all current applicants for green cards have received them (estimated to be 6 years), or eight years after the bill becomes law, whichever is earlier.

    Orange Card holders must check in each year with the government and show that they continue to meet all of the requirements listed above.

    Requirements for permanent Green Card

    After the 6-8 year waiting period, Orange Card holders may qualify for a permanent green card, if they meet the following requirements:

    Continue to meet all of the requirements to get an Orange Card
    If over 18, worked or attended school for at least 6 years
    What are the advantages of the Orange Card program?

    One simple process to legalize qualifying undocumented immigrants who entered the U.S. before 1/1/06.
    Does not leave out millions of undocumented immigrants who live in the U.S. and contribute to the economy, as does the current version of S. 2611
    Treats all family members equally
    Much easier to administer, so less fraud and fewer problems
    For 2-5 year immigrants:
    No requirement to leave the U.S. and come back
    No guestworker requirement
    No waiver of right to appeal
    Same waiting period as others
    If you believe this amendment is an improvement on the bill as written, Monday is the day to call your Senator and say so. (Capitol switchboard: 202-224-3121.) If not, tell me why not. This is a hugely important issue, and I hope everyone will let fly.

    Comment


    • #3
      Is this a joke?

      Comment


      • #4
        not a joke

        http://www.mercurynews.com/mld/mercu...s/14629261.htm

        Comment


        • #5
          50-50 chance...

          let see this coming week..

          Comment


          • #6
            I think it is reasonable, because it will let ALL of the illegals to come out of the shadows and for us to know who is who.

            Comment


            • #7
              I WOULD SUGGEST BROWN - TO MATCH THE COLOR OF ****-WORKERS SPECIALTY !!!

              BUT WHY ON EARTH SHOULD WE EVER LET THESE ****STERHEADS GET LEGAL STATUS IN US???!!!

              NO ****-WORKER AMNESTY EVER !
              WWW.FAIRUS.ORG FOREVER !

              Comment


              • #8
                TO ALL:
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                http://www.angelfire.com/planet/ilw.com/
                It takes seconds! And it's confidential.

                Comment


                • #9
                  LIEMASTER SHOULD GO TO HELL!!!!!!!

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    61 to 37, did not pass.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      do you think those people like 3 days after jan 7 can get a waiver?

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        I don't think there is a waiver, but they may try to discuss it at the interview with USCIS.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Senate rejects plan to allow all illegal immigrants to stay
                          Feinstein offered proposal as alternative to 'three-tiered' compromise

                          Tuesday, May 23, 2006; Posted: 11:52 a.m. EDT (15:52 GMT)
                          from CNN

                          Sen. Dianne Feinstein
                          WASHINGTON (AP) -- The Senate rejected a California Democrat's plan to allow the estimated 12 million illegal immigrants in the country to remain, work and eventually become Americans, preserving a fragile bipartisan coalition needed to pass the bill.

                          Several lawmakers who voted against the proposal offered by Sen. Dianne Feinstein on Tuesday said they did so reluctantly, but out of necessity to ensure survival of the broader immigration bill. The legislation is expected to win Senate passage Wednesday or Thursday.

                          "This legislation is on the edge of the ledge as it is," said Sen. Arlen Specter of Pennsylvania, one of the Republicans supporting a delicate compromise that has kept the bill alive -- letting two-thirds of illegal immigrants stay but making the other third leave.

                          Feinstein's amendment, defeated 61 to 37, would have supplanted the compromise that allows illegal immigrants here five years or more to stay and work six years and seek legal residency after paying back taxes and fines and showing they were learning English.

                          Those in the country two to five years under the compromise would have to go to a point of entry, exit and file an application to return as a guest worker. Those here less than two years must leave the country, but could apply from their native country to return as a guest worker and wait in line to get a visa.

                          "I have come to believe that the three-tiered system is unworkable, that it would create a bureaucratic nightmare and it would lead to substantial fraud," Feinstein said Tuesday.

                          Sen. Tom Harkin, D-Iowa, said the compromise bill could mean losing Latinos in his state who have helped revive some of its small towns by buying homes and starting small businesses.

                          Feinstein offered the plan just before Senate Majority Leader Bill Frist set the stage for a preliminary vote Wednesday that could quickly bring the bill to a final vote. The bill appears headed for passage.

                          A bigger fight on the bill is still to come -- when the House and Senate meet to negotiate a compromise bill. The House passed an enforcement-only bill that makes illegal immigrants felons, cracks down on hiring of illegal immigrants and steps up border security. It offers no path to citizenship or a guest worker program, which critics say is amnesty.

                          "If we are lucky, the House of Representatives will say it's got to be better," Sen. Jeff Sessions, R-Alabama, said of the Senate bill after predicting Monday it would pass.

                          Feinstein's proposal faced an uphill climb. Republican Sen. John Cornyn of Texas said it suffered the same "infirmities" as the bipartisan bill approved by the Senate Judiciary Committee, which offered citizenship for all illegal immigrants.

                          Feinstein's proposal required all illegal immigrants to register with the Department of Homeland Security, get fingerprinted and go through criminal and national security background checks.

                          They would get an "orange card" encrypted with identifying information and signifying they are legal workers after passing the background checks, demonstrating an understanding of English, U.S. history and government and paying back taxes and a $2,000 fine to apply.

                          They would go to the back of the line and could apply for legal permanent residency when a number they are given is reached.

                          Also Monday, the Senate showed support for President Bush's plan to deploy National Guard troops to the border by endorsing an amendment authorizing governors to order their state's Guard units to perform duties in border states.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Honestly, I think 'orange card' is very similar to temporary worker program, except for it is cheaper and more efficient way to deal will illegals. Its only weakness is that it will attract more illegals in the future.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Senator Feinstein, with all due respect, is the only Senator about whom I wonder how she got elected there.

                              Very nice lady, looks like very nice person, she speaks softly and all, but her amendments (starting with SJC hearings) were just total deal-breakers.
                              I am glad that Senate rejected it.

                              On the skeptical note, there are some reports that confirm what I expected all along - the Bill might just die in conference, if not stripped of Guest Worker provision.

                              Here are the latest reports:


                              Option # 1. House-Senate Conference agrees to Senate version compromise, but House then refuses to bring the matter to vote before the House floor "for lack of support among majority of majority".
                              This is a procedural block and reason for it is that, according to some speakers, nothing would be worse for elections than bringing "divisive Senate Bill for vote before the full House".


                              Option # 2. House - Senate Conference agrees to House version compromise, the Bill then dies in Senate where majority of Democrats ,joined with few Republicans, kill it.
                              Who takes the blame?
                              Obviously Sen. Reid.


                              Option # 3. No Conference report at all.


                              Option # MIRACLE. Senate-House Conference agrees to Senate version, with minor amendments (stronger enforcement, stricter criteria for Guest Worker eligibility, no path to USC but legalization for most of 12 mln and etc.)

                              Comment



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