Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

is there any way for my girlfriend to move here

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • is there any way for my girlfriend to move here

    we have been together 4 years in august and we put her in the lottery every year. she is from Northern Ireland. is there some way one of my family members can sponser her? she has been here to visit 6 times and 3 months is the longest she has stayed and she did that twice? I'm willing to pay a lawyer if we can get her here to live and work.

    Thank you

  • #2
    we have been together 4 years in august and we put her in the lottery every year. she is from Northern Ireland. is there some way one of my family members can sponser her? she has been here to visit 6 times and 3 months is the longest she has stayed and she did that twice? I'm willing to pay a lawyer if we can get her here to live and work.

    Thank you

    Comment


    • #3
      You can apply for a fiancee visa K1 for her (only if you are USC and with legal age for doing that), or a student visa F1 if she is accepted at a university and you or other member of your family can sponsor her for the duration of her studies, there are some temporary work visas H-2B or H-1B.You can read about those visas on www.USImmigrationForAll.com and you can find help from cristina@usimmigrationforall.com

      All the best !

      www.USImmigrationForAll.com
      Frank G. Becker & Associates
      www.USImmigrationForAll.com

      Comment


      • #4
        well that would be all and good but we are both female and the law does not allow *** marriage let alone *** marriage with the possibility of citizenship unlike when a man takes a bride from another country. Its very discriminating.

        Comment


        • #5
          ok well i guess i should have said same partner marriage.

          Comment


          • #6
            Umm,I was about the answer but you two are females ;-) hehe.

            Umm,I am sorry hun to break it down to you,but there is NO way for your girlfriend to come to the US to live with you and just be here and become a resident.Just like you could not go Ireland and decide "hey I wanna live there and be a resident" You can't...no laywer can even help you,not to mention listen to you.

            The Only Only way for you two to get together is,if your girlfriend marries,your brother,or best friend whatever...in order to come here with a fiance visa.Oterwise I see no other logical way.Since same *** marriage is not recignized by INS,if you guys would be married in a different country,wouldn't matter.

            All you guys could do is a fake marriage with a dude you know,and is in it.But good luck finding one lol...but truly, thats you guys's only option....

            Comment


            • #7
              Actually, I believe that the original poster could legally immigrate to Britain (her partner's home country) if she had a civil union with her partner. It is my understanding that Britain recently legalized same-*** civil unions, and that immigration benefits are available.

              While Britain isn't nearly as wonderful as America - nowhere is - I'm sure that it's far from the worst place to live.

              Comment


              • #8
                <BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by SunDevilUSA:
                Actually, I believe that the original poster could legally immigrate to Britain (her partner's home country) if she had a civil union with her partner. It is my understanding that Britain recently legalized same-*** civil unions, and that immigration benefits are available.

                While Britain isn't nearly as wonderful as America - nowhere is - I'm sure that it's far from the worst place to live. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>
                Actually, it is Denmark, not UK for civil unions. UK has civil partnerships, which has subtle, but distinct differences as civil unions. The purpose of civil partnerships is to allow joint assets to be passed down to the surviving partner, but it does not allow the legal status of civil unions. That is an important distinction.
                "Facts are stubborn things; and whatever may be our wishes, our inclinations, or the dictates of our passion, they cannot alter the state of facts and evidence." John Adams on Defense of the boston Massacre

                Comment


                • #9
                  <BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by iperson:
                  Hmm, tough situation. I really emphatize with you OP. Basically all the roads to the US shut for your GF.
                  This is what is wrong with the US immigration system. You have to be wealthy and educated to be able to immigrate, or plain lucky.
                  Otherwise... just show me the way how an average Jane or Joe can do it.
                  There is so much talk about how bad these people are crossing illegally or overstaying, but no one really looks at the reality of the immigration system.
                  Just an idea- make it more human and accessible if you are a hard working and honest person, willing to work and contribute to the society, but were not born into privilaged life.
                  Shall we consider the possible reform that would be more reasonable? </div></BLOCKQUOTE>
                  It is more like perserverance and plain luck.
                  "Facts are stubborn things; and whatever may be our wishes, our inclinations, or the dictates of our passion, they cannot alter the state of facts and evidence." John Adams on Defense of the boston Massacre

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    I have to strongly agree with iperson and Hudson, the system is broken at its core and family immigration perhaps exhibits the saddest reality of the effects of a legislation that has failed to consider reality in favor of a restrictionist approach that, if anything, has greatly contributed to aggravate the problem.

                    Since 1996, sometimes called "mean 96", illegal immigration has grown exponentially reaching unprecedented levels. Ignoring the problem and pretending it's not there is not going to change things, it'll only make it worse. This is what has happened here. Demand for immigration is there and it's growing, the need remains, failure to provide an efficient and REALISTIC mechanism to channel such demand results in an ever growing problem.

                    Doing what millions of immigrants did years ago is now considered "illegal". The law has eliminated the most fundamental mechanisms for relief and common sense approaches to legal immigration. The goal was "national security" and "border/population control". The result is millions of people whose whereabouts are unknown, an underground population subject to slavery and exploitation, fraud, deceit and shame. The result is families being broken all the time, kids being detained, the elderly being imprisoned, wide open discrimination, humiliation of citizens who petition for a relative, hardship and despair.

                    It's not hard to see or understand what has happened, it only takes the will to do so. Change the law or leave it as it is, make it harder for people to come, create tougher penalties, make it harder for people to stay, do whatever you want... all that will not change ONE BIT the needs of the people who seek to come to this country, the needs of mixed families in the U.S. and the needs for qualified and unqualified labor in this nation. It's as simple as that, an act of Congress cannot and will not change human reality.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      <BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by iperson:
                      That's my point Hudson, perseverence has nothing to do with immigrating.
                      There is not a chance if you are not a sought after professional, or a wealthy businessman, or didn't win the lottery or didn't marry an American.
                      If you are a middle class or working class individual after even college, and not in a sought after profession, and don't have at least half a million $$$$, and haven't met an American and haven't fallen in love, your chances are zip zero.
                      Not a chance of doing it by yourself. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>
                      I will agree that the system is broken and unrealistic. However I disagreed with your presumption that you only have to be wealthy and educated. That is not necessarily so. The main problem with the immigration system is that it is overtly complex, much like the tax code. What is legal in one visa status may not be legal in another visa status. However, there are more self help books, immigration kits at reasonable prices, and free cost services for the average person to utilize. One just has to look a litte on the internet or ask questions on this board or similar discussion boards. That is why I said perserverence and luck, not wealth and education.
                      "Facts are stubborn things; and whatever may be our wishes, our inclinations, or the dictates of our passion, they cannot alter the state of facts and evidence." John Adams on Defense of the boston Massacre

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        <BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by iperson:
                        Continuing my post above.
                        I wonder what does this very system set out to accomplish?
                        It creates a cacoon America where foreigners are admitted to provide for the American people, either the luxury services (scientific research, technology and business) and the cheap labor to secure the basic infrastructure.
                        In the middle is the American middle class who has everything provided for, so that it doesn't have to basically work. At least most pretend to work most of the time, spending most of it on fun (tv, games, clubs etc), spending (shopping) and food (see the obesity statistics).
                        Even education system objective in America is to primarily make sure the kids have fun. That's what my friend who is a father was told in his daughter's school. The kids don't learn ANYTHING.

                        The immigration system is flawed, not only for prospective or willing immigrants but also for the American people and the future of this country. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>
                        The problem with this system is that it is outdated based on economic and migration trends. As Houston said, "ailure to provide an efficient and REALISTIC mechanism to channel such demand results in an ever growing problem" probably is the most accurate description I have seen on this board. But the problems with the US immigration system is not unique. Europe has a very big problem with illegal immigration and unskilled immigrants from its former colonies. In Canada, if you immigrate based on family, the liklihood of not being permitted to work is greater if one comes via employment immigration to Canada. However, Canada has a very favorable status with US immigration system. So, what some do is the immigrate to Canada, go to school or work temporarily, and then emigrate to the US. In other words, even with a more restrictive immigration system of Canada and Europe, those countries have very similar problems to the US, but from different backgrounds on why that is the case. Furthermore, the percentage of immigrants to total population is still not reached the level of the 1920's.

                        Finally, the educational system is broken. However there are three groups to lay blame to. First are the parents who use the school as a sarrogate parent. These parents are uninterested and unmotivated in their child's education. Second are the school administers who want more money for obscure or "fun" activities than for teaching a child. Finally, are the teacher unions who want only mediocre teachers with only higher pay raises or beneits. I consider the best education to be that of Japan, Taiwan, Korea, England, and Germany, in that order. The US is in the lower top ten because there are some very good public schools in the major cities and in most rural areas. In fact, if you live in a mid-size town, your school is very good at education, but not in the big urban schools such as New York, LA, Houston, Dallas, Chicago, etc.
                        "Facts are stubborn things; and whatever may be our wishes, our inclinations, or the dictates of our passion, they cannot alter the state of facts and evidence." John Adams on Defense of the boston Massacre

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Naming and discussing all the problems of INA would be impossible in just one post; the statute is plagued with contradictions, draconian provisions and lacks even basic mechanisms flexible enough to handle reality and dynamic situations.

                          From a family's point of view, removal and permanent banishment for a minor violation is a draconian penalty imposed not only on the alien but in many cases on citizen relatives as well. Waivers have become an opportunity for citizens to "beg" and ask for mercy. All of these factors combined with the demeaning and persistent intrusions in private lives and the ever-present presumptions of fraud create an environment dominated by fear and intimidation with no avenue for relief.

                          Looking at the problem as a whole, it would appear that current legislation is not designed to prevent illegal immigration but to prevent immigration of any kind.

                          The restrictionist and "tough" approach of 1996 has contributed to the growth of a problem that's clearly now out of control. When the results of a law is broken families, economic hardships and 6% of the population in some form of illegal limbo, it becomes clear that such legislation is not effective and must be modified.

                          Many years ago aliens were not considered "criminals by default" and requirements were much simpler. Complying with the law was a matter of common sense. The exact same conduct is now considered criminal or illegal, and all because of a restrictionist approach. The "old law" didn't cause an economic debacle, didn't cause chaos, didn't cause an increase in illegal immigration. If anything, the country grew stronger to become the economic super-power it is today.

                          The new approach has created a new class of sub-human individuals and directly contributed to the criminal industry of human trafficking and smuggling.

                          The U.S. Congress is the brightest legislative body there is. No other is more capable, no other better at what it does. Congress has now the unique opportunity to put an end to the immigration problem by passing intelligent and modern legislation based on reality, common sense and respect for others. Immigration law is not designed to control machines but to deal with individuals with families, dreams and hope of a better life.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            The problem is that while some play mind and blame games, thinking of some parallel "realities" to justify their visions, there's real families being broken up, kids who grow up without a father or a mother, citizens being exposed to hardship and uncertainty, people being exploited in slave-like conditions, millions who live in fear and billions spent to catch the guy who's committing the horrible crime of "working without authorization".

                            It doesn't make sense. This is the greatest nation on earth, there's no reason to avoid changing a statute that, while controversial in nature, is not helping to ease the problem but in fact contributes to make it worse on a daily basis, a statute that's in conflict with traditional American values of fairness, respect and justice.

                            Comment



                            Working...
                            X