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  • selective service

    I recently discovered that i was to register for the selective service. I am now past the age, so in order to apply for citizenship, I need to get a Status Information Letter. The form from the selective service to get this letter asks what my INS status was at time of entry and what my current USCIS status is. I am unsure of these. I came in as an IR2, which is a child of a citizen (actually I am a stepchild) and have since been a permanent resident. Is IR2 a correct INS status to put in? and is permanent resident a correct USCIS status? Please help as I want to do everything correctly the first time. Thank you!!

  • #2
    I recently discovered that i was to register for the selective service. I am now past the age, so in order to apply for citizenship, I need to get a Status Information Letter. The form from the selective service to get this letter asks what my INS status was at time of entry and what my current USCIS status is. I am unsure of these. I came in as an IR2, which is a child of a citizen (actually I am a stepchild) and have since been a permanent resident. Is IR2 a correct INS status to put in? and is permanent resident a correct USCIS status? Please help as I want to do everything correctly the first time. Thank you!!

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    • #3
      Why did you forget to register? This is a big problem; see attorney
      These people stop at Nothing !

      Death to IMBRA AND VAWA !

      God Bless America and no one else !!!

      Comment


      • #4
        It wasn't that I forgot. I was never aware that I had to. My stepfather and uncles all served in the military (hence how he met and married my mother) and even they were unaware that a NON citizen would have to register. And unfortunately attorneys cost a lot of money, which I do not have. That is why I was filling out the selective service form like the website tells me to.

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        • #5
          http://www.afsc.org/youthmil/selective-service/Register...ective-Service.htm#6

          Many immigrants are not aware of their obligation to register or do not become aware of this obligation until after they turn 26. The Selective Service has gotten tougher on non citizens that fail to register. The Selective Service is now more likely to assume that a person that failed to register did so "knowingly and willfully. If you want to show that you did not know you had to register for Selective Service, you may have only your word. If, for example, the Selective Service never sent you a notice or you can show that you were not living at the address where the government sent the notices then your word might be enough. You may also have other good explanations for why your failure to register was not done on purpose.

          Are there risks to my immigration status if I do not register?

          Yes, if you are tried and convicted for not registering.

          A conviction for failure to register makes you deportable. This means that if you are not a US citizen you risk being forced to leave the US even if you currently have some legal status in the country.

          A conviction for failure to register may also make you inadmissible from the United States. This means that if you are a legal permanent resident now, you could have problems when you try to reenter the United States. If you are not a legal permanent resident, you could lose the possibility of obtaining this status in the future, or even the possibility of entering as a non-immigrant (e.g., as a student, visitor, etc.).

          A conviction for failure to register may also make you ineligible for citizenship for at least five years.

          If I did not register, but I am not convicted, can I still face immigration consequences?

          You will probably be ineligible to become a United States citizen if you fail to register and cannot show that you were unaware of the registration requirement.

          To qualify for US citizenship you need to show you are a person of "good moral character" for the five years before your applying for citizenship. The INS considers a person to lack "good moral character" if he failed to register for Selective Service when he was aware of his obligation to do so. It appears that the INS will only automatically deny you citizenship until you turn 31. Nevertheless, certain INS examiners or entire INS offices may treat a person's failure to register as a lack of "good moral character" even after the five-year period. However, if the INS denies your citizenship application because you failed to register, you can challenge the denial by showing that your failure to register was not "knowing and willful." The INS may also use your failure to register to deny an application for legal permanent residence ("green card").
          These people stop at Nothing !

          Death to IMBRA AND VAWA !

          God Bless America and no one else !!!

          Comment

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