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  • Bill O'Riely is ignorant

    I was watching the Bill O'Riely Show, AKA I love to kiss the Republican's A S S cuz they give me tax breaks.

    He was mentioning a protect for a speaker at the University of Conn. He was p i s s e d off because a Michael Moore of the Republicans was speaking, and students started to shout "You S U C K". I cant remember her name, but it shouldnt be too hard to find if you are interested.

    The part that is bugging me is the fact that he called these people shouting a Nazi, and throughout the show implied that the Lefts are also Nazi. I think that make Bill the most stupid immature and inconsiderate ignorant person ever. I do agree that it was rude of some of the students to shout You S U C K, but they were doing nothing but exercising there rights. But to call them Nazi is obscene. I dont think Bill knows that the Nazis did, they are the same people who were responsible for the Holocast. They are the same people who took millions of lives, and destroyed even more. To compare a few students doing what they have a right to do Nazi is wrong. If that is the case then I call Bill O'Riely, Hitler. Bill O'Riely uses his show to only get his point accross and if his guests do not agree with that, he insults them and puts them down.

    Bill, you need to talk about how u got sued for having phone s e x with ur intern, and wanting to shower in Falafal. Why dont u clear that up, ur hypocrite and a coward for not wanting to debate George Clooney. You whimp.

  • #2
    I was watching the Bill O'Riely Show, AKA I love to kiss the Republican's A S S cuz they give me tax breaks.

    He was mentioning a protect for a speaker at the University of Conn. He was p i s s e d off because a Michael Moore of the Republicans was speaking, and students started to shout "You S U C K". I cant remember her name, but it shouldnt be too hard to find if you are interested.

    The part that is bugging me is the fact that he called these people shouting a Nazi, and throughout the show implied that the Lefts are also Nazi. I think that make Bill the most stupid immature and inconsiderate ignorant person ever. I do agree that it was rude of some of the students to shout You S U C K, but they were doing nothing but exercising there rights. But to call them Nazi is obscene. I dont think Bill knows that the Nazis did, they are the same people who were responsible for the Holocast. They are the same people who took millions of lives, and destroyed even more. To compare a few students doing what they have a right to do Nazi is wrong. If that is the case then I call Bill O'Riely, Hitler. Bill O'Riely uses his show to only get his point accross and if his guests do not agree with that, he insults them and puts them down.

    Bill, you need to talk about how u got sued for having phone s e x with ur intern, and wanting to shower in Falafal. Why dont u clear that up, ur hypocrite and a coward for not wanting to debate George Clooney. You whimp.

    Comment


    • #3
      why do you watch the fool?

      You need to save our sorrows and watch some guy called Keith Olbermann on MSNBC at the same time that Oreilly joker is on the air.

      I used to watch the Oreilly joke until I realized how much of a j e r k he is.

      Comment


      • #4
        Antivirus and Marasmus: Simply because O'Reilly has a viewpoint that differs from your self-serving ones, does not mean that he is a "j e r k."

        O'Reilly's views closely match those of the American people. You understand that the American people are the ones who matter in this debate, don't you?

        After all, both of you - alongside 12 million other lawbreakers - are begging and pleading and groveling for the American people to let you remain in THEIR country legally.

        Comment


        • #5
          Sundevil,
          So now am an illegal?

          I wonder how you arrived at that conclusion you buzzard.

          Comment


          • #6
            I don't watch the O'Reilly Factor because the few times that I have, Bill pisses me off. However, I agree with SunDevilUSA in that a lot of people do watch and agree with him.

            Comment


            • #7
              Fox's viewers typically live in the "red" states. On average they're 57-year-olds who make $57,880 a year, the highest income of any viewership except CNBC. These viewers consider themselves religious.According to Murdoch, "This is a large and loyal audience.."
              http://iml.jou.ufl.edu/projects/Fall01/Weil/bias.htm

              _______________________________________________



              Here is some info on FOX Founder and Owner, Rupert Murdoch From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.

              -----------------------------

              http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rupert_Murdoch


              Rupert Murdoch

              Keith Rupert Murdoch (born March 11, 1931) is an Australian-born American media proprietor who is the majority shareholder and managing director of News Corporation, one of the world's largest and most influential media corporations. He is one of the few chief executives of any multinational media corporation who (through his family company) has a controlling ownership share in the companies he runs. Beginning with newspapers, magazines and television stations in his native Australia, Murdoch expanded into British and American media, and in recent years has become a powerful force in satellite television, the film industry and other forms of media.

              Murdoch is generally regarded as the single most politically influential media proprietor in the world and is regularly courted by politicians in the United States, United Kingdom and Australia.


              Early life


              Murdoch was born in Melbourne, Australia. His father was Sir Keith Murdoch, a stern and somewhat distant figure who was the son of a Presbyterian minister from Scotland. The elder Murdoch worked as a journalist and adviser to Billy Hughes, the Prime Minister of Australia during World War I, and became Australia's most influential newspaper executive, directing the Melbourne-based Herald and Weekly Times Ltd. He was reportedly often frustrated by young Murdoch's early progress and despaired of his son being able to take over from him. Rupert Murdoch was deeply influenced by his father, and although he clearly wished to emulate him, he often rebelled.

              Murdoch's mother is Dame Elisabeth Murdoch, née Elisabeth Greene, who came from an upper-class family of Irish and English Protestant descent. Dame Elisabeth, at 96, remains a strong influence on Rupert, usually in the direction of moderation. The young Murdoch was educated at Geelong Grammar School and later at Worcester College at the University of Oxford


              Start of business career


              After his father's sudden death in 1952, Rupert returned to Australia to take over the running of his father's business. Although he had expected to inherit a considerable fortune and a prominent position, he was left with a relatively modest inheritance"”after death duties and taxes, the main legacy was ownership of the Adelaide News (which gave its name to his company).

              Over the next few years, Murdoch gradually established himself as one of most dynamic media proprietors in the country, quickly expanding his holdings by acquiring a string of daily and suburban newspapers in most capital cities, including the Sydney afternoon paper, The Daily Mirror, as well as a small Sydney-based recording company, Festival Records. His acquisition of the Mirror proved crucial to his success, allowing him to challenge the dominance of his two main rivals in the Sydney market, the Fairfax Newspapers group, which published the hugely profitable Sydney Morning Herald, and the Consolidated Press group, owned by Sir Frank Packer, which published the city's leading tabloid paper, the Daily Telegraph.

              In 1964, Murdoch made his next important advance when he established The Australian, Australia's first national daily newspaper, based first in Canberra and later in Sydney. The Australian, a broadsheet, gave Murdoch a new respectability as a "quality" newspaper publisher, and also greater political influence since The Australian has always had an elite readership, if not always a large circulation.

              In 1972, Murdoch acquired the Sydney-based Daily Telegraph from Sir Frank Packer, making him one of the "big three" newspaper proprietors in Australia, along with Sir Warwick Fairfax in Sydney and his father's old Herald and Weekly Times Ltd in Melbourne. In the 1972 elections, Murdoch swung his newspapers' support behind Gough Whitlam and the leftist Australian Labor Party, but by 1975 he had turned against Labor, and since then has almost always supported the rightist Liberal Party.

              Over the next ten years, as his press empire grew, Murdoch established a hugely lucrative financial base, and these profits were routinely used to subsidize further acquisitions. In his early years of newspaper ownership Murdoch was an aggressive, micromanaging entrepreneur. His standard tactic was to buy loss-making Australian newspapers and turn them around by introducing radical management and editorial changes and fighting no-holds-barred circulation wars with his competitors. By the 1970s, this power base was so strong that Murdoch was able to acquire leading newspapers and magazines in both London and New York, as well as many other media holdings.

              Murdoch's desire for dominant cross-media ownership manifested early"”in 1961 he bought an ailing Australian record label, Festival Records, and within a few years it had become the leading local recording company. He also bought a television station in Wollongong, New South Wales, hoping to use it to break into the Sydney television market, but found himself frustrated by Australia's cross-media ownership laws, which prevented him from owning both a major newspaper and television station in the same city. Since then he has consistently lobbied, both personally and through his papers, to have these laws changed in his favor.



              Acquisitions in Britain

              Murdoch moved to Britain in the mid 1960s and rapidly became a major force there after his acquisitions of the News of the World, The Sun and later The Times and The Sunday Times, which he bought in 1981 from the Thomson family, who had bought it from the Astor family in 1966. Both takeovers further reinforced his growing reputation as a ruthless and cunning business operator. His takeover of The Times aroused great hostility among traditionalists, who feared he would take it "downmarket." This led directly to the founding of The Independent in 1986 as an alternative quality daily.

              Murdoch has a particular genius for tabloid newspapers. The Sun in London, The Post in New York, The Herald Sun in Melbourne and The Daily Telegraph in Sydney are among the most successful, profitable and influential tabloids in the world. Despite his personal conservatism, he allowed his editors (particularly in Britain) to exploit the selling power of soft-core erotica in the form of topless page three girls (such as Samantha Fox) to increase circulation. As a result, Auberon Waugh of Private Eye dubbed him "The Dirty Digger", a nickname that has endured.

              In 1986 and 1987, Murdoch moved to adjust the production process of his British newspapers, over which the printing unions had long maintained a highly restrictive grip. This led to a confrontation with the printing unions NGA and SOGAT. The move of News International's London operation to Wapping in the East End resulted in nightly battles outside the new plant. Delivery vans and depots were frequently and violently attacked. Ultimately the unions capitulated and other media companies soon followed Murdoch's lead.

              Before the Wapping dispute, most British newspapers were chronically unprofitable, partly (though not entirely) because of inefficient and restrictive work practices imposed by the printing unions. These included overstaffing, inheritance of jobs by family members and most importantly resistance to the introduction of new printing technology which would have caused both job losses and the reduction in the power of the unions. The high-tech Wapping plant"”the first newspaper office in the world to be totally computerized"”was planned and built in strict secrecy, and its very existence was kept hidden from the unions until it was ready to go into operation. Murdoch and the Conservative government of Margaret Thatcher collaborated during this affair and the Thatcher government provided heavy police protection for the new plant"”dubbed "Fortress Wapping" by its detractors"”during the sometimes violent demonstrations at the area.



              Moving into the United States

              Murdoch made his first acquisition in the United States in 1973, when he purchased the San Antonio News. Soon afterwards he founded the National Star, a supermarket tabloid, and in 1976 he purchased the New York Post. On September 4, 1985, Murdoch became a naturalized citizen to satisfy the legal requirement that only United States citizens could own American television stations. In 1987 he bought The Herald and Weekly Times Ltd in Australia, the company that his father had once managed. By 1991, his Australian-based News Corp. had amassed huge debts, which forced Murdoch to sell many of the American magazine interests he had acquired in the mid-1980s. Much of this debt came from his British-based Sky Television satellite network, which incurred massive losses in its early years of operation, which (like many of his business interests) was heavily subsidized with profits from his other holdings until he was able to force rival satellite operator British Satellite Broadcasting to accept a merger on his terms in 1990. (The merged company, BSkyB has dominated the British pay-TV market since).

              In 1995, Murdoch's Fox Network became the object of scrutiny from the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) when it was alleged that News Ltd.'s Australian base made Murdoch's ownership of Fox illegal. The FCC, however, ruled in Murdoch's favor, stating that his ownership of Fox was in the public's best interests. In the same year Murdoch announced a deal with MCI Communications to develop a major news website as well as funding a right-wing magazine, The Weekly Standard. In the same year, News Corp. launched the Foxtel pay television network in Australia in a partnership with Telstra.

              In 1996, Fox established the Fox News Channel, a 24-hour cable news station. Since its launch it has consistently eroded CNN's market share, and it now bills itself as "the most-watched cable news channel." This is due in part to recent ratings studies, released in the fourth quarter of 2004, showing that the network had nine of the top ten programs in the "Cable News" category. However, FNC's cable-news dominance has in recent years been challenged by the growth of MSNBC.

              In 1999, Murdoch significantly expanded his music holdings in Australia by acquiring the controlling share in a leading Australian independent label, Michael Gudinski's Mushroom Records; he merged the two as Festival Mushroom Records (FMR). Both Festival and FMR were managed by Murdoch's son James Murdoch for several years.



              Personal life

              Murdoch has been married three times. His first marriage in 1956 was to Patricia Booker, with whom he had one child, Prudence Murdoch. They were divorced in 1967. Very little is known about their marriage, and Murdoch himself has never spoken about it publicly.

              In the same year, he married an employee, journalist Anna Torv. The timing (and Murdoch's subsequent behaviour) suggests that he had begun the relationship with Torv well before his marriage to Patricia ended.

              Torv and Murdoch had three children: Elisabeth Murdoch, Lachlan Murdoch and James Murdoch. Anna and Rupert divorced acrimoniously in 1998 and Anna Murdoch later revealed that her ex-husband had begun a relationship with Wendi Deng while he and Anna were still married. Anna Murdoch received a settlement of some reported US$1.7 billion in assets. After the divorce Murdoch married Wendi Deng, a former Vice-President of Star TV, in June 1999. Murdoch has since had two children with Wendi: Grace (born 2001) and Chloe (born 2003).

              Murdoch's eldest son Lachlan, formerly the deputy chief operating officer at the News Corporation and the publisher of the New York Post, was Murdoch's heir apparent prior to resigning from his executive posts at the global media company at the end of July 2005. Lachlan's surprise departure left James, the chief executive of the satellite television service British Sky Broadcasting since November 2003, as the only Murdoch child still directly involved with the company's operations, though Lachlan has agreed to remain on the News Corporation's board.

              There is reported to be tension between Murdoch and his oldest children over the terms of a trust holding the family's 28.5 percent stake in News Corporation, estimated in 2005 to be worth about $6.1 billion. Under the trust, his children by Wendi Deng share in the proceeds of the stock but have no voting privileges or control of the stock. Voting rights in the stock are divided 50/50 between Murdoch on the one side and his children of his first two marriages. This was agreed to by Anna Murdoch in lieu of a large cash settlement at the time of their divorce. Murdoch's voting privileges are not transferrable but will expire upon his death and the stock will then be controlled solely by his children from the prior marriages, although their half-siblings will continue to derive their share of income from it.

              It is Murdoch's stated desire to have his children by Wendi Deng given a measure of control over the stock proportional to their financial interest in it. However it does not appear that he has any strong legal grounds to contest the present arrangement, and both ex-wife Anna and their three children are said to be strongly resistant to any such change. [1]

              Rupert Murdoch was diagnosed with prostate cancer in 2000 and treated with apparent success


              Recent activities

              In 1999, The Economist reported that Murdoch had made £1.4 billion ($2.1 billion) in profits over the previous 11 years but had paid no net corporation tax. It further reported, after an examination of what was available of the accounts, that Murdoch would normally have expected to pay a corporate tax of approximately $350 million. The article explained that the corporation's complex structure, international scope and use of offshore havens allowed News Corporation to avoid tax. [2] [3]

              In late 2003, Murdoch acquired a 34 percent stake in Hughes Electronics, operator of the largest American satellite TV system, DirecTV, from General Motors for $6 billion (USD). Among his properties around the world are UK's The Times and the New York Post, the latter of which he turned from New York City's most liberal newspaper into one of the most conservative in the USA.

              In 2004, Murdoch announced that he was moving News Corp.'s base of operation from Australia to the United States. This was widely seen as a reaction to the inability of John Howard's Liberal Party of Australia to alter Australia's media cross-ownership rules, which Murdoch is known to have wanted changed for decades, and which have prevented him from acquiring more newspapers and TV stations in Australian cities. In December of 2004, Murdoch purchased a penthouse apartment in New York for $44 million (USD). At the time this was the highest price ever paid for a residence in New York.

              On July 20, 2005, News Corp. bought Intermix Media Inc., which held MySpace.com and other popular social networking-themed websites. On September 11, 2005, News Corp announced that it would buy IGN Entertainment for $650 million (USD). [4]

              Rupert Murdoch and Ted Turner have been competitors for quite some time. However, it became worse when Murdoch launched the Fox News Channel to compete against Turner's CNN, ultimately dethroning CNN, with FNC the most popular news network on cable television.

              In September 2005 the subject of Murdoch's alleged anti-competitive business practices resurfaced when Australasian media proprietor Kerry Stokes, owner of the Seven Network, instituted legal action against News Corporation and the PBL organisation, headed by Kerry Packer. The suit stems from the 2002 collapse of Stokes' planned cable TV network C7, which would have been a direct competitor to the other major Australian cable provider, Foxtel, in which News and PBL have major stakes.

              Stokes claims that News Corp. and PBL (along with several other media organsiations) colluded to force C7 out of business by using undue influence to prevent C7 from gaining vital broadcast rights to major sporting events. In evidence given to the court on 26 September, Stokes alleged that PBL executive James Packer came to his home in December 2000 and warned him that PBL and News Limited were "getting together" to prevent the AFL rights being granted to C7.



              Murdoch and politics

              Murdoch is a political conservative, despite the fact that he has been a strong supporter of British Prime Minister Tony Blair of the Labour Party. In the early 1970s he supported the Australian Labor Party, but since 1975 he has generally supported the conservative parties in Australia. In the United States he usually supports Republicans.

              While at Oxford Murdoch was active in the Labour Club, and he actively supported the Australian Labor Party for some years. Since 1975, however, he has generally supported the Liberal Party of Australia (which is a center-right party). In Britain, he formed a close alliance with Margaret Thatcher, and The Sun was widely credited with helping John Major win an unexpected election victory in the 1992 general election. In the 1997 general election, however, Murdoch's papers were either neutral or supported Labour under Tony Blair. In the US he has been a long-time supporter of the Republican Party and was a friend of Ronald Reagan. Regarding Pat Robertson's 1988 presidential bid, he said, "He's right on all the issues." [5] Murdoch's papers strongly supported George W. Bush in both the 2000 and 2004 presidential elections.

              Murdoch is often accused of running partisan media coverage for political parties that promote policies and decisions which favour his commercial interests. For example, it is believed that Murdoch tried to suppress publication of the memoirs of Chris Patten, the last British governor of Hong Kong, in an attempt to curry favour with China. Patten's book was critical of the Chinese government. Whatever the motives, the book was dropped from publication by Murdoch's HarperCollins publishing company. It was only because of Patten's political influence that the story came to light and the book was published by another firm. It is speculated that Murdoch wanted to please the Chinese government because it happened around the time he was attempting to get a foothold in the Chinese market with the launch of Star TV.

              In a speech in New York, Rupert Murdoch said that the UK Prime Minister Tony Blair said the BBC coverage of the Hurricane Katrina disaster was full of hatred of America. Mr Murdoch is a strong critic of the BBC, which he believes has a liberal bias.

              Murdoch's British media outlets generally support eurosceptic positions, and generally show contempt for the European Union. Murdoch publications worldwide tend to adopt Francophobic, pro-Israeli and pro-American views. During the buildup to the 2003 invasion of Iraq, all 175 Murdoch-owned newspapers worldwide editorialized in favour of the war. [6] Murdoch also served on the board of directors of the Cato Institute.

              There is contention over the defining of Murdoch's politics as 'conservative', and some feel that it might be more appropriate to see Murdoch's politics as being purely pragmatic and opportunistic, and that behind the support he lends to conservative parties, his overriding agenda is to advance the fortunes of himself and News Corp. It is also likely that he prefers to support conservative parties in large measure because they advocate laissez-faire economic policies, which would allow News Corp a freer hand in its business dealings, and because conservatives tend to support the relaxation or abolition of existing cross-media ownership laws which, in countries such as Australia, have restricted Murdoch's ability to gain the overwhelming market dominance that he clearly desires for his company.

              Comment


              • #8
                Censorship is not the same as expressing freedom of speech; that is what Nazis do. You are too ignorant to know the difference. How dare you come here and PRETEND to know ANYTHING about freedom of speech. These were not even students attending that school but outsiders. People attending went to hear her speak and they had that right but were denied by these Nazis. These Nazis censored Ann Coulter, the smartest woman in the world. You are so stupid you didn't even know her name. No one has the right to prevent someone from giving a speech to an auduience that wants to listen. She has a great book that I am reading now called "How to talk to a liberal - if you must" I highly recommend it. You should read this book to help you learn grammer.

                Comment


                • #9
                  I am a new member and I noticed some of your "high and mighty" posts, Michael. You said this: " I highly recommend it. You should read this book to help you learn grammer."

                  I say this, Michael. I highly recommend that you learn to spell GRAMMAR, before you start trying to correct someone else. Get it, Bud?

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    spelling is different from grammer; it is not my fault ILW does not have spell check

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      LOL, stupid is as stupid does. That should be your slogen Michael. After Footsoldier corrected your spelling of grammar, u still spelled it wrong. You are an i d i o t, and whatever you say shouldnt be read cuz you are also a hypocrite like Bill.

                      My only concern was O'Reily called a bunch of people protesting Nazis. Dont you people realize the point I am trying to make. Maybe you all need to catch up on ur history about what the Nazis did, and maybe then you would realize that people protesting a speaker would be considered monks compared to Nazis.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Fool; The Nazis BEGAN by censoring people from speaking; by shouting down all dissent; don't you pretend to tell me about history. Liberals in America are WORSE than the Nazis. At least the Nazis didn't praise their own soldiers being killed. At least the Nazis tried to liberate Russia. At least Nazis were courageous and good tacticians. And they were very efficient and tidy. Liberals are NOT monks; they are terrorists, cowards and thugs. They are also inefficient and they smell. READ ANN COULTER'S BOOK FOR THE TRUTH - "HOW TO TALK TO A LIBERAL - IF YOU HAVE TO"

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          What kind of an i d i o t stands up for the Nazis, wait, i know, a Nazi. Thats what the republicans are trying to turn this country into. Thank god that Americans eyes have opened and the president has the lowested approval. This will allow the Democrats to come in and clean this mess up.

                          As for Michael, "they smell". Nice one. Where did u get that, the 1st grade.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Antivirus: If America is such a "mess," as you assert, then why are you jumping through hoops trying to remain here?

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              The choice wasnt up to me when I was 7 years old to come here in the situation we did. I have been here for 16 years, and consider myself an American. I wouldnt be on this forum expressing my views, if i didnt feel like i was an American. I love this country because it is my home, i do not have another home in a different country. And i know what is right and what is wrong. And those people did nothing to be called Nazis. That is the only point i am trying to make. I donated money to Katrina and Rita because everyone knows that was a big mess. I want our country to be on the right track.

                              Comment

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