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  • Noted American Passes

    Laurance Rockefeller, a conservationist, philanthropist and leading
    figure in the field of venture capital, died yesterday. He was 94.

    His net worth was $1.5 billion. Known for his environmental work,
    he served under five presidents, working on conservation and
    the outdoors, and founded the American Conservation Association in 1958 and was head of Jackson Hole Preserve Inc., a conservation
    organization that played a major role in protecting parts of the
    Grand Tetons in Wyoming and redwood trees in California.
    His was a marked influence across the board, for the
    national park movement, on outdoor recreation, national beautification,
    historical preservation, and on what constitutes the public good.

    Rockefeller developed national parks in the U.S. Virgin Islands
    and Vermont, and chaired the White House Conference on Natural Beauty.
    He sat on the boards of the National Geographic Society,
    National Recreation and Parks Association, regional conservation societies, New York Zoological Society, and others.


    Rockefeller also was a pivotal developer of the economics field that
    became known as venture capital.

    In 1938 he helped finance World War I pilot Eddie Rickenbacker's Eastern
    Airlines, and he later invested in McDonnell Aircraft Corp., Intel Corp. and Apple Computer Inc. He sought to fund ventures that would strengthen national security, welfare or the economy. For venture capital,
    he was a true pioneer.

    He graduated from Princeton University in 1932 and studied law at Harvard for twoyears. In 1934, he married Mary French, who was a trustee of the YWCA, Spelman College and the Gordon-Conwell Theological Seminary.

    Laurance was a Navy man, serving during WW II as a lieutenant commander.

    He served on the board of Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center and
    became the first recipient of the American Cancer Society's
    Alfred P. Sloan Memorial Award for his contributions to cancer research.
    Laurence once owned a majority in the stock of Readers Digest.
    By 1980, two-thirds of Reader's Digest stock was transferred to seven
    charities controlled by Laurence. He executed his timing brilliantly,
    asthe shares were undervalued at the time, and that enabled the
    recipients to have greater flexability.

    One was The Fund for the Hudson Highlands which received
    475,000 shares. The gift of 588,424 shares of stock to the
    Metropolitan Museum of Art later worth worth a vast fortune,
    the greatest gift ever given to any cultural institution in the world.

    In 1990-91, Hudson Highland distributed their shares and
    received $51,693,290, and $48,128,000.
    Those slated for the Met later rose to $422,000,000.
    Still, the museum has expended vast amounts of monies,
    and today seeks donations.

    Laurance Rockefeller's interventions and well-placed seed money
    also reshaped the hotel industry, promoted better zoos and
    more extensive greenways, and raised expectations and results
    for travelers, conservationists, and environmentalists.

  • #2
    Laurance Rockefeller, a conservationist, philanthropist and leading
    figure in the field of venture capital, died yesterday. He was 94.

    His net worth was $1.5 billion. Known for his environmental work,
    he served under five presidents, working on conservation and
    the outdoors, and founded the American Conservation Association in 1958 and was head of Jackson Hole Preserve Inc., a conservation
    organization that played a major role in protecting parts of the
    Grand Tetons in Wyoming and redwood trees in California.
    His was a marked influence across the board, for the
    national park movement, on outdoor recreation, national beautification,
    historical preservation, and on what constitutes the public good.

    Rockefeller developed national parks in the U.S. Virgin Islands
    and Vermont, and chaired the White House Conference on Natural Beauty.
    He sat on the boards of the National Geographic Society,
    National Recreation and Parks Association, regional conservation societies, New York Zoological Society, and others.


    Rockefeller also was a pivotal developer of the economics field that
    became known as venture capital.

    In 1938 he helped finance World War I pilot Eddie Rickenbacker's Eastern
    Airlines, and he later invested in McDonnell Aircraft Corp., Intel Corp. and Apple Computer Inc. He sought to fund ventures that would strengthen national security, welfare or the economy. For venture capital,
    he was a true pioneer.

    He graduated from Princeton University in 1932 and studied law at Harvard for twoyears. In 1934, he married Mary French, who was a trustee of the YWCA, Spelman College and the Gordon-Conwell Theological Seminary.

    Laurance was a Navy man, serving during WW II as a lieutenant commander.

    He served on the board of Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center and
    became the first recipient of the American Cancer Society's
    Alfred P. Sloan Memorial Award for his contributions to cancer research.
    Laurence once owned a majority in the stock of Readers Digest.
    By 1980, two-thirds of Reader's Digest stock was transferred to seven
    charities controlled by Laurence. He executed his timing brilliantly,
    asthe shares were undervalued at the time, and that enabled the
    recipients to have greater flexability.

    One was The Fund for the Hudson Highlands which received
    475,000 shares. The gift of 588,424 shares of stock to the
    Metropolitan Museum of Art later worth worth a vast fortune,
    the greatest gift ever given to any cultural institution in the world.

    In 1990-91, Hudson Highland distributed their shares and
    received $51,693,290, and $48,128,000.
    Those slated for the Met later rose to $422,000,000.
    Still, the museum has expended vast amounts of monies,
    and today seeks donations.

    Laurance Rockefeller's interventions and well-placed seed money
    also reshaped the hotel industry, promoted better zoos and
    more extensive greenways, and raised expectations and results
    for travelers, conservationists, and environmentalists.

    Comment


    • #3
      I thought you were gonna tell us that "Weezie" from "The Jeffersons" died.

      Otherwise, who cares?

      "Oh, we're movin' on up...
      to the East side.

      To a de-lux apartment..
      in the sky-i-i."
      Sweet Madame Belu

      Comment


      • #4
        Because, the U.S., as your army training must teach you,
        is safe, because we are number one.

        Our lead in semi-conductor technology has given us the means
        to a stronger economy, and a more effecient, advanced country.

        Our military and civilian advancements depend on
        companies like INTEL, and Texas Instruments.

        Rockefeller, and my departed friend, Eugene McDermott, who started
        Texas Instruments, are indeed, notables.

        They have both endowed our country.

        Comment


        • #5
          Texas Instruments? Didn't they go bankrupt 20 years ago?
          Sweet Madame Belu

          Comment



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