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born in the US however lived in MX for 16 yrs

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  • born in the US however lived in MX for 16 yrs

    My wife has a friend that was born in the US and has her original birth certificate. Her parents are both from mexico and they have lived in mexico ever since she was one year old. She wants to come to school in the US and get her high school diploma ( she is currently 16) and my wife and I wanted to try to help her do this.

    She comes from a poor family and we could help her out. I wanted to know what I needed to do to get her Legally in the country. She is a citizen so do I have to get her a passport to come via ground or will the western hemisphere travel initiative be ok? I dont want any problems when crossing the border.

    Also she does not have any other US govt ID's as she came back to MX when she was a year old as I see that for a passport you need to have a govt ID. Will a MX ID work or a notorized letter from someone?

    What is the best way to do this?

    let me know if you have any other questions

  • #2
    My wife has a friend that was born in the US and has her original birth certificate. Her parents are both from mexico and they have lived in mexico ever since she was one year old. She wants to come to school in the US and get her high school diploma ( she is currently 16) and my wife and I wanted to try to help her do this.

    She comes from a poor family and we could help her out. I wanted to know what I needed to do to get her Legally in the country. She is a citizen so do I have to get her a passport to come via ground or will the western hemisphere travel initiative be ok? I dont want any problems when crossing the border.

    Also she does not have any other US govt ID's as she came back to MX when she was a year old as I see that for a passport you need to have a govt ID. Will a MX ID work or a notorized letter from someone?

    What is the best way to do this?

    let me know if you have any other questions

    Comment


    • #3
      <BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by Rich:
      My wife has a friend that was born in the US and has her original birth certificate. Her parents are both from mexico and they have lived in mexico ever since she was one year old. She wants to come to school in the US and get her high school diploma ( she is currently 16) and my wife and I wanted to try to help her do this.

      She comes from a poor family and we could help her out. I wanted to know what I needed to do to get her Legally in the country. She is a citizen so do I have to get her a passport to come via ground or will the western hemisphere travel initiative be ok? I dont want any problems when crossing the border.

      Also she does not have any other US govt ID's as she came back to MX when she was a year old as I see that for a passport you need to have a govt ID. Will a MX ID work or a notorized letter from someone?

      What is the best way to do this?

      let me know if you have any other questions </div></BLOCKQUOTE>
      Since she is a USC, a certified birth certificate and A US drivers license or other US state or federal ID card will be required to fill out the passport application. No foreign ID will be allowed. However, if you are a US and you want to help, you can vouch for her by filling out DS-71 along with your valid ID. This must be done in the presence of a passport agent. You must know her for at least two years as well. This can be done at any US embassy or consulate in Mexico.
      "Facts are stubborn things; and whatever may be our wishes, our inclinations, or the dictates of our passion, they cannot alter the state of facts and evidence." John Adams on Defense of the boston Massacre

      Comment


      • #4
        <BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by Hudson:
        Since she is a USC, a certified birth certificate and A US drivers license or other US state or federal ID card will be required to fill out the passport application. No foreign ID will be allowed. However, if you are a US and you want to help, you can vouch for her by filling out DS-71 along with your valid ID. This must be done in the presence of a passport agent. You must know her for at least two years as well. This can be done at any US embassy or consulate in Mexico. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

        Since she has been in Mexico she does not have an US state of federal ID so that makes it hard to get the passport. We have not known her for more than 2 years so we cannot do the DS-71.

        Comment


        • #5
          I think she needs to go to the U.S. Embassy in Mexico City or any U.S. Consulate on Mexico and since she is a U.S. Citizen they may help her to fill out the right paperwork to get a U.S. Passport

          Comment


          • #6
            Rich,

            Sure she can get a passport with only her birth certificate. My sister was born in the US and we got her passport when she was 1 years old without having any other form of ID, just the plain birth certificate! Don't you worry about it for a minute...US wouldn't deny a passport from its citizen for having only birth certificate in their hand! Indeed, how foreign people get their first passport when they are a kid, and don't hold any sort of ID yet, but only their birth certificate....same way! So, I'm pretty positive it works with birth certificate just fine!
            Ability may get you to the top, but it takes character to keep you there.

            Comment


            • #7
              <BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by Jeanine:
              Rich,

              Sure she can get a passport with only her birth certificate. My sister was born in the US and we got her passport when she was 1 years old without having any other form of ID, just the plain birth certificate! Don't you worry about it for a minute...US wouldn't deny a passport from its citizen for having only birth certificate in their hand! Indeed, how foreign people get their first passport when they are a kid, and don't hold any sort of ID yet, but only their birth certificate....same way! So, I'm pretty positive it works with birth certificate just fine! </div></BLOCKQUOTE>
              The problem Jeane is proof of identity when applying for a passport. She does not have one that will acceptable. But she can go to the Embassy to see if she can obtain a State identification card that could be acceptable.
              "Facts are stubborn things; and whatever may be our wishes, our inclinations, or the dictates of our passion, they cannot alter the state of facts and evidence." John Adams on Defense of the boston Massacre

              Comment


              • #8
                Well, I'm sure she still can get a passport. That's how I got my first passport as well. I didn't have any sort of ID yet, since I was a kid, only a birth certificate. Now, on the birt certificate we have our parents name, who have passport and ID in their hand already. I don't think everyone gets an ID card or DL when they are born....I've got my first ID when I turned 16. And I've got my first passport when I was maybe 3. I'm sure there won't be any complications with her, having a US birth certificate, but not having any ID. If she really wanted to make sure, she would xerox her Mexican ID (or passport) have an official translator translate it, and take that along with the birth certificate to the US embassy. Then I'm pretty positive she would get a passport without any doubt at all.
                Ability may get you to the top, but it takes character to keep you there.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Jeanine, When your father got her a passport he filled out an application and he signed for her by father, he proved his ID with his passport+ID to make sure he is the father of a child. In US it is easy when in foreign country, it is not.

                  What she will have to do, take her birth certificate,, or she must complete the form + Fee and mail back to the County where she was born and ask for certified copy of her birth certificate. she can also do throught the Embassy/Consulate.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    <BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by Jeanine:
                    Well, I'm sure she still can get a passport. That's how I got my first passport as well. I didn't have any sort of ID yet, since I was a kid, only a birth certificate. Now, on the birt certificate we have our parents name, who have passport and ID in their hand already. I don't think everyone gets an ID card or DL when they are born....I've got my first ID when I turned 16. And I've got my first passport when I was maybe 3. I'm sure there won't be any complications with her, having a US birth certificate, but not having any ID. If she really wanted to make sure, she would xerox her Mexican ID (or passport) have an official translator translate it, and take that along with the birth certificate to the US embassy. Then I'm pretty positive she would get a passport without any doubt at all. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>
                    Xerox copy would not work, Either a foreign notary copy, notarized by the mexican Goverment entity, or notarized by a US Notary Public at the US Embassy or Consulate. She can either make a trip to the US to some relatives and obtain a state ID card, or she can or have one of her relatives vouch for her. That is the simplest way for her to get the passport.

                    The problem is that she can't get one, the problem is the proof required to obtain one.
                    "Facts are stubborn things; and whatever may be our wishes, our inclinations, or the dictates of our passion, they cannot alter the state of facts and evidence." John Adams on Defense of the boston Massacre

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      that is exactly the problem. That she needs to proof that the birth cert is hers. I will have her go to the consulate in monterrey to see what they say.

                      Should I get my lawyer involved in the states?

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Where are the kid's parents in this scenario? If the kid is genuinely a United States Citizen, then surely her parents will be able to provide the necessary documentation to prove it?

                        I note from above that she is apparently from a poor family, but does that also make them completely helpless? It appears that they were able to successfully migrate (illegally?) between Mexico and America all by themselves!!

                        If the parents aren't responsible enough to be able to prove that their daughter is a citizen of the United States, then...well, what is there left to say?

                        Comment

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