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    My Philippine girl friend works as a teacher in a vocational college in the city of Pilar, on the island of Bohol. She has a bachelor's degree in Hotel Resource Management and has worked in that field for several years prior to her teaching assignment. She and I are planning to get married later this year. It was my understanding that Fiancé Visas take several months to process and I already have a Philippine Tourist visa, we thought that it would be all right for her to apply for a U.S. Tourist Visa in the mean time. This would have allowed us to travel back and forth, meet both families, and make our plans. Then apply for the Fiancé Visa. She filled out the necessary paper work. I went online and copied information about the entire process to include the interview and sent this to her. The information however appeared contradictory. While it indicated interviewing officers ask about itineraries and length of stay, in other places on the State Department web site, they advise against making reservations and getting airline tickets ahead of time. This is in case the interviewing officer refuses to grant the visa, which makes sense. The problem is that this creates a "Catch-22," for the interviewee, since they cannot validate either the itinerary or the intent to return to the Philippines. It also provides the perfect opportunity for a visa denial even though in my girl friend's case, her paper work indicated a three-week stay. The interviewing officer did in fact ask her how long she intended to stay but before she could respond, immediately asked another question. My girl friend answered the second question. He then asked her where she planned to stay. She said, with me, "her boy friend," and gave him my address. She then had the distinct impression that his mood changed and everything went down hill from there. He denied her request for a Tourist Visa for the reason that she did not respond to his question about her intended length of stay, despite this information being in her paper work. I am sorry but this does not make sense and seems very arbitrary. The consular officer did not have any type of identification badge, so she does not know his name and he apparently did not introduce himself. Upon leaving, she ran into a guard, who informed her that her first mistake was saying she had a "boy friend." He also indicated that it is practically derigeur, for these officers to refuse visa requests the first time around, making reapplication mandatory. Not to mention the costs involved. The consular officer told her, she could reapply in six months.

    So here are my questions. Should I go ahead and apply for a Fiancé Visa right now or wait the six months? Should I expect more problems, now that she probably has a file established? What if anything can I do to re mediate or facilitate this process. Do I need a lawyer?

  • #2
    My Philippine girl friend works as a teacher in a vocational college in the city of Pilar, on the island of Bohol. She has a bachelor's degree in Hotel Resource Management and has worked in that field for several years prior to her teaching assignment. She and I are planning to get married later this year. It was my understanding that Fiancé Visas take several months to process and I already have a Philippine Tourist visa, we thought that it would be all right for her to apply for a U.S. Tourist Visa in the mean time. This would have allowed us to travel back and forth, meet both families, and make our plans. Then apply for the Fiancé Visa. She filled out the necessary paper work. I went online and copied information about the entire process to include the interview and sent this to her. The information however appeared contradictory. While it indicated interviewing officers ask about itineraries and length of stay, in other places on the State Department web site, they advise against making reservations and getting airline tickets ahead of time. This is in case the interviewing officer refuses to grant the visa, which makes sense. The problem is that this creates a "Catch-22," for the interviewee, since they cannot validate either the itinerary or the intent to return to the Philippines. It also provides the perfect opportunity for a visa denial even though in my girl friend's case, her paper work indicated a three-week stay. The interviewing officer did in fact ask her how long she intended to stay but before she could respond, immediately asked another question. My girl friend answered the second question. He then asked her where she planned to stay. She said, with me, "her boy friend," and gave him my address. She then had the distinct impression that his mood changed and everything went down hill from there. He denied her request for a Tourist Visa for the reason that she did not respond to his question about her intended length of stay, despite this information being in her paper work. I am sorry but this does not make sense and seems very arbitrary. The consular officer did not have any type of identification badge, so she does not know his name and he apparently did not introduce himself. Upon leaving, she ran into a guard, who informed her that her first mistake was saying she had a "boy friend." He also indicated that it is practically derigeur, for these officers to refuse visa requests the first time around, making reapplication mandatory. Not to mention the costs involved. The consular officer told her, she could reapply in six months.

    So here are my questions. Should I go ahead and apply for a Fiancé Visa right now or wait the six months? Should I expect more problems, now that she probably has a file established? What if anything can I do to re mediate or facilitate this process. Do I need a lawyer?

    Comment


    • #3
      Thanx for the information and the prompt reply. Will there be any problem if I apply for the K-1 within the next six months? I already have a Philippine Tourist Visa and have visited her parents.

      Comment


      • #4
        <BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by davdah:
        You can apply today. The point of the first denial was due to suspected immigrant intent based on a non-immigrant visa. The K-1 should not be a problem </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

        Well it WASN'T a problem; I am not so sure that it won't be a problem now. What were these 2 thinking ?

        Comment


        • #5
          I'm not so sure I follow you. What is it that would create a problem for us now? We are not lawyers or para-legals.

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