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THE UNFAIR EXPLOITATION OF NICOLAI VALUEV

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  • THE UNFAIR EXPLOITATION OF NICOLAI VALUEV

    THE UNFAIR EXPLOITATION OF NICOLAI VALUEV

    04.04.04 - By Izyaslav "Slava" Koza - If we ask the casual boxing fan who Nikolai Valuev is, the most likely first response we will get is "Who?" If we ask the casual boxing fan who has read an article or two about him, or what he thinks about Nikolai Valuev, the number one response we will get is "He is nothing, but a freak with a blown up record, who will never be anything in boxing." This article is written with these fans in mind.

    Now for the Facts: Valuev is huge! For 300 pounds, he fills out quite nicely at 7'2". His record is perfect 35 and 0 with 27 K.O.'s. However, hed has fought nobody of any note except guys like **** Ryan and Otis Tisdale, lower rank gate keepers, for prospects and such.
    Valuev has fought two times in the United States. He has knocked out Terrel Nelson in 2, and George Linberger in 1. Both fights were in Atlantic City.

    From most accounts, Valuev impressed the audience, for having good athletic ability for a man his size (attributed to athletic background in Discus throwing and Basketball).


    The Myth: Valuev is managed by the Russian mafia. His trainers/managers hide him in Russia to make them money. Valuev is an overprotected hype job, whose managers have used financial influence to raise Valuev's ranking in the WBA (referring to the incident awhile back when the WBA admitted it had made typographical errors in its list).

    The Truth about the Myth: Nikolai Valuev is managed by Oleg Shalaev, a former boxer himself, who took Nikolai under his wing in College and trained him since 1993. Shalaev has no reported criminal ties. In fact, he was forced to bend to the rules of Russian boxing Organizations. Valuev and Shalaev walked out in protest, which shows the kind of character both men have. This seems like the kind vicious cultural rumor that gives fighters and their promoters bad names.

    If you look at Valuev's record you will see Valuev has fought basically everywhere. Some of these include Germany, Japan, Korea, Australia, England, and the two fights in the United States. For a man supposedly protected, as a small time cash cow, he has the credentials of a world traveling journeyman.

    In order to be overprotected, and use financial influence to raise rankings, a fighters promotional team has to have money. By Shalaev's own admission, he has none, even if he wanted to use his "financial influence" he wouldn't have enough money to buy Don King a can of hair spray. This is partly why Valuev has fought all over the globe. Promotion teams from all over the world offer to create partnerships with Shalaev, and Nikolai gets on the plane and fights whoever it is these promotional partners put in front of him. Unfortunately, by Valuev's admission in interviews, everyone is keen on separating him from his friend and trainer Shalaev. Shalaev took Nikolai in and gave him a place to live and trained him into the man he is today, Nikolai is loyal, and this is why he doesn't run into the ring under the banner of somebody else.

    Another little hindrance to Valuev's career is visa problems. After his second fight with George Linberger, the American promoters who set up this fight wanted Valuev to fight on September 14, 2001 in Vegas. Valuev and his team were gearing up for their first show in Vegas, and had to refuse because of the 9/11 attacks (this author's opinion is, Valuev wouldn't have been let into the United States anyway so soon after such an event. In fact, I'm not sure if United States airspace was even open to international aircraft at the time). Valuev's punishment for such actions was a lawsuit against Shalaev, which not only ordered him to pay 180,000 dollars for breach of contract, but also banned Valuev from fighting in the United States.


    What the **** am I trying to say here? Basically my point is this, when fans ask why Valuev has not fought the "bigger names," they have to realize two things: One, bigger name fighters want bigger dollars. Two, Russian promoters cannot offer the same kind of green that Mr. Arum, or Mr. King can. That's right, let's take a hypothetical "contender" like a Hasim Rahman.

    Would Rahman rather:
    a. Fight an American lower rank fighter in Vegas, and earn some outrageous sum (by world standards). Or
    b. Would Rahman rather travel to Russia, or some neutral destination such as Germany, fight for less money against a much bigger opponent, he along with most of the boxing world knows nothing about?

    I am not trying to get on Rahman's case, in as much as he has fought many great opponents. However, boxing is a money sport. There are very few Erik Morales's, Marco Antonio Barrerra's, and Chris Byrd's, who will travel anywhere and fight anyone. Both Vitali and Wlad made their names in view of the fact of that Chris Byrd gave them a chance. Now, which top contender will give Valuev a chance? A fighter cannot make (or break the myth of his perfect record) his name in boxing by himself.



    I also think it is fair to say that Nicolai makes less money then just about any signed boxer in the U.S. It is very difficult to convince the American boxing public that boxers don't, as Nicolai says, "Make millions, and role around like cheese in butter."

    The truth is, Valuev is a working boxer. He is not some hot shot "Oscar De la Hoya" superstar. He boxes for a living, and as most signs indicate, does so fairly, without bending any rules or breaking any laws.

    How good a fighter is he? Well, the safest thing to say is, its impossible to tell at this point. He may never fight on American soil again, and therefore, may never challenge for a title, lest the champion give him a shot in Germany or some such place. Is he worthy of a shot? The truth is, no he is not, yet the point is, that is not his fault. The truth is, since he is not an American, geography and politics dictate his opportunities.

    I really do feel it is unfair to judge a fighter before seeing him, and that is what I think happened to Valuev. He was judged before the verdict was in, and thanks to some, he may never get the chance to prove whether he has the makings of a champion or not. How fair is it that some athletes cannot reach their full potential because of the country they were born in? Or because they wish to remain loyal? Valuev could have very easily dumped his promoter Shalaev and been exploited by someone who cares less about him. Now that I think about it, I like the way his name sounds, Valuev. I guess fighters who have values cannot challenge for titles in this day and age.

    I would like to post some statistics that many people might not know, and I didn't until a little while ago. THE 1 CONTENDER TO THE WBA title has to officially fight three fights (although we know how easy it is for famous fighter with money to get around those rules. Not taking anything away from them, I am just pointing out some rules)

    1. WITH #6 RATED GUY (COST TO FIGHT TEAM-50-100G AMERICAN)
    2. wITH #3 RATED GUY (cOST TO FIGHT TEAM-200-300G AMERICAN)
    THIS MONEY THE PROMOTER HAS TO FIND HIMSELF. IF A CHAMPIONSHIP FIGHT TAKES PLACE THEN THE TV AND COMMERCIAL BUYERS PAY FOR THAT FIGHT.

    BY THE MOST MODEST ESTIMATES, TO TAKE A FIGHTER FROM 0 AND MAKE HIM INTO A CHAMPION, COSTS HIS SPONSORS 2 MILLION US."

    From what I have heard, Valuev and his team didn't have 37,000 dollars to cover the expenses from their second match with George Linberger. What a tragedy that such a great talent like Valuev is wasted, while lesser heavyweights like Ruiz & Rahman have all the advantages.

  • #2
    THE UNFAIR EXPLOITATION OF NICOLAI VALUEV

    04.04.04 - By Izyaslav "Slava" Koza - If we ask the casual boxing fan who Nikolai Valuev is, the most likely first response we will get is "Who?" If we ask the casual boxing fan who has read an article or two about him, or what he thinks about Nikolai Valuev, the number one response we will get is "He is nothing, but a freak with a blown up record, who will never be anything in boxing." This article is written with these fans in mind.

    Now for the Facts: Valuev is huge! For 300 pounds, he fills out quite nicely at 7'2". His record is perfect 35 and 0 with 27 K.O.'s. However, hed has fought nobody of any note except guys like **** Ryan and Otis Tisdale, lower rank gate keepers, for prospects and such.
    Valuev has fought two times in the United States. He has knocked out Terrel Nelson in 2, and George Linberger in 1. Both fights were in Atlantic City.

    From most accounts, Valuev impressed the audience, for having good athletic ability for a man his size (attributed to athletic background in Discus throwing and Basketball).


    The Myth: Valuev is managed by the Russian mafia. His trainers/managers hide him in Russia to make them money. Valuev is an overprotected hype job, whose managers have used financial influence to raise Valuev's ranking in the WBA (referring to the incident awhile back when the WBA admitted it had made typographical errors in its list).

    The Truth about the Myth: Nikolai Valuev is managed by Oleg Shalaev, a former boxer himself, who took Nikolai under his wing in College and trained him since 1993. Shalaev has no reported criminal ties. In fact, he was forced to bend to the rules of Russian boxing Organizations. Valuev and Shalaev walked out in protest, which shows the kind of character both men have. This seems like the kind vicious cultural rumor that gives fighters and their promoters bad names.

    If you look at Valuev's record you will see Valuev has fought basically everywhere. Some of these include Germany, Japan, Korea, Australia, England, and the two fights in the United States. For a man supposedly protected, as a small time cash cow, he has the credentials of a world traveling journeyman.

    In order to be overprotected, and use financial influence to raise rankings, a fighters promotional team has to have money. By Shalaev's own admission, he has none, even if he wanted to use his "financial influence" he wouldn't have enough money to buy Don King a can of hair spray. This is partly why Valuev has fought all over the globe. Promotion teams from all over the world offer to create partnerships with Shalaev, and Nikolai gets on the plane and fights whoever it is these promotional partners put in front of him. Unfortunately, by Valuev's admission in interviews, everyone is keen on separating him from his friend and trainer Shalaev. Shalaev took Nikolai in and gave him a place to live and trained him into the man he is today, Nikolai is loyal, and this is why he doesn't run into the ring under the banner of somebody else.

    Another little hindrance to Valuev's career is visa problems. After his second fight with George Linberger, the American promoters who set up this fight wanted Valuev to fight on September 14, 2001 in Vegas. Valuev and his team were gearing up for their first show in Vegas, and had to refuse because of the 9/11 attacks (this author's opinion is, Valuev wouldn't have been let into the United States anyway so soon after such an event. In fact, I'm not sure if United States airspace was even open to international aircraft at the time). Valuev's punishment for such actions was a lawsuit against Shalaev, which not only ordered him to pay 180,000 dollars for breach of contract, but also banned Valuev from fighting in the United States.


    What the **** am I trying to say here? Basically my point is this, when fans ask why Valuev has not fought the "bigger names," they have to realize two things: One, bigger name fighters want bigger dollars. Two, Russian promoters cannot offer the same kind of green that Mr. Arum, or Mr. King can. That's right, let's take a hypothetical "contender" like a Hasim Rahman.

    Would Rahman rather:
    a. Fight an American lower rank fighter in Vegas, and earn some outrageous sum (by world standards). Or
    b. Would Rahman rather travel to Russia, or some neutral destination such as Germany, fight for less money against a much bigger opponent, he along with most of the boxing world knows nothing about?

    I am not trying to get on Rahman's case, in as much as he has fought many great opponents. However, boxing is a money sport. There are very few Erik Morales's, Marco Antonio Barrerra's, and Chris Byrd's, who will travel anywhere and fight anyone. Both Vitali and Wlad made their names in view of the fact of that Chris Byrd gave them a chance. Now, which top contender will give Valuev a chance? A fighter cannot make (or break the myth of his perfect record) his name in boxing by himself.



    I also think it is fair to say that Nicolai makes less money then just about any signed boxer in the U.S. It is very difficult to convince the American boxing public that boxers don't, as Nicolai says, "Make millions, and role around like cheese in butter."

    The truth is, Valuev is a working boxer. He is not some hot shot "Oscar De la Hoya" superstar. He boxes for a living, and as most signs indicate, does so fairly, without bending any rules or breaking any laws.

    How good a fighter is he? Well, the safest thing to say is, its impossible to tell at this point. He may never fight on American soil again, and therefore, may never challenge for a title, lest the champion give him a shot in Germany or some such place. Is he worthy of a shot? The truth is, no he is not, yet the point is, that is not his fault. The truth is, since he is not an American, geography and politics dictate his opportunities.

    I really do feel it is unfair to judge a fighter before seeing him, and that is what I think happened to Valuev. He was judged before the verdict was in, and thanks to some, he may never get the chance to prove whether he has the makings of a champion or not. How fair is it that some athletes cannot reach their full potential because of the country they were born in? Or because they wish to remain loyal? Valuev could have very easily dumped his promoter Shalaev and been exploited by someone who cares less about him. Now that I think about it, I like the way his name sounds, Valuev. I guess fighters who have values cannot challenge for titles in this day and age.

    I would like to post some statistics that many people might not know, and I didn't until a little while ago. THE 1 CONTENDER TO THE WBA title has to officially fight three fights (although we know how easy it is for famous fighter with money to get around those rules. Not taking anything away from them, I am just pointing out some rules)

    1. WITH #6 RATED GUY (COST TO FIGHT TEAM-50-100G AMERICAN)
    2. wITH #3 RATED GUY (cOST TO FIGHT TEAM-200-300G AMERICAN)
    THIS MONEY THE PROMOTER HAS TO FIND HIMSELF. IF A CHAMPIONSHIP FIGHT TAKES PLACE THEN THE TV AND COMMERCIAL BUYERS PAY FOR THAT FIGHT.

    BY THE MOST MODEST ESTIMATES, TO TAKE A FIGHTER FROM 0 AND MAKE HIM INTO A CHAMPION, COSTS HIS SPONSORS 2 MILLION US."

    From what I have heard, Valuev and his team didn't have 37,000 dollars to cover the expenses from their second match with George Linberger. What a tragedy that such a great talent like Valuev is wasted, while lesser heavyweights like Ruiz & Rahman have all the advantages.

    Comment


    • #3
      In December 2005, Valuev won ONE-HANDEDLY (his team didn't disclose info about his hand injury until after the fight) contested fight with Ruiz (in Germany) and earned WBA title.

      It remains to be seen how well he will do, given fair opportunities to advance his athletic career.

      Comment


      • #4
        who gives a $hit?

        Comment


        • #5
          Who asked you to give any?

          Comment


          • #6
            I will be glad to send you all you want. Nobody cares about some eastern european boxer. Our concerns are about American citizens and their welfare, not somebody from outer Slobovia

            Comment


            • #7
              I will be glad to send you all you want.
              I don't want anything from you.

              Nobody cares about some eastern european boxer. Our concerns are about American citizens and their welfare, not somebody from outer Slobovia
              Go outside, breath some fresh air.

              Comment


              • #8
                somebody should disable your 'cut and paste' keys on your computer. As you have noticed, no one gives a $hit about some eastern european boxer.
                Frankly, there are many more concerns in our world than the plight of some 'coodah been a contendah..."

                Comment


                • #9
                  For your info, the guy is already World Champion in WBA version.

                  Why don't you read before you comment on something?

                  And why do you care to comment if you don't care to read?

                  May God Bless You,
                  Someone12, and Help
                  You Overcome Your
                  Mental and Spiritual
                  Challenges!

                  I am always here to support and wish you the Best.

                  IE

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    I repeat (for the intelligent-impaired) - who cares? The average AMerican citizen is not going to give two $hit$ about some russky boxer....how is his status or lack of alleged opportunity going to mean anything for those hard-working Americans putting food on the table for their kids, while worrying that some visa-cheating, bord-jumping dirtbag illegal alien may get some kind of half-a$$ed work permit and steal yet another job from an American? It won't mean the contents of a cat box.

                    Comment


                    • #11


                      Valuev nowdays is World Champion in WBA version and doesn't need to "cheat" or "jump" or do anything to get a visa.

                      You are a dummy, Someone12

                      May God Still Bless You!

                      IE

                      Comment

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