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  • "HOUSE REPUBLICAN EXPECTED TO YIELD TO SENATE"

    This article is for the antifascists of the world who still claims that house republicans(which is about a group of 50 GOP out of 230 republicans, will murder the president's chance of getting a well deserved victory on immigration, and lets not forget that the president is A GOP, NOT A DEMOCRATS...Ive always said that because the president is a republican, there is no way the party will allow 50 members to speak for the entire republican base and disrespect the president..Its one thing when you get shut out by democrats, but its very mind boggling to get slap by a small angry group in your party.

    --------------------------------------


    House GOP expected to yield on legislation
    By Stephen Dinan
    THE WASHINGTON TIMES
    May 26, 2006


    The House is the only obstacle that stands between President Bush and a comprehensive immigration bill, and the White House yesterday predicted that the chamber's Republicans will give in.
    White House press secretary Tony Snow said House Republicans will want to pass border security badly enough to back down from the fight against what many consider amnesty for illegal aliens, knowing there is a "heavier political price for failing to act, than for acting."
    "If you are a Republican member of Congress and you're concerned about illegal immigration, do you really want to say to your constituents: You know, I'm going to wait a couple of years before I take up the issue of people knowingly hiring illegal aliens, I want to wait a couple of years before I go ahead and try to identify who the illegal aliens are, I want to wait a couple of years before I start grappling with what to do with these 11 or 12 million people who are here illegally," Mr. Snow said.
    A president always has the most influence in the backroom House-Senate negotiations, but yesterday, Mr. Snow wouldn't tip the administration's hand when asked how they would approach the conference committee.
    "At this point, let's get a bill through the Senate, let's figure out where the fault lines are," he said.
    But those fault lines between the House and Senate are fairly public, deep and fundamental.
    The House passed a bill in December that stepped up border enforcement and interior enforcement, enabled local law enforcement in border areas to help enforce immigration laws and cracked down on employers who hired illegal aliens.
    The Senate included some of those measures but put far more emphasis on future foreign workers and a pathway to citizenship for the current estimated 10 million to 12 million illegal aliens, a move House Republicans consider an unacceptable amnesty.
    "If both parties in a negotiation are running the other way, they will never meet in any middle," said Don Stewart, spokesman for Sen. John Cornyn, Texas Republican.
    "The question for the House is some agreement to do more than just border security. The question for the Senate is: Are they willing to be less generous than the Senate bill? Without a yes on both of those two questions, there's no point in the conference going forward."
    From the House side, Majority Leader John A. Boehner acknowledged there were "two very separate and distinct directions that we're going," but said he still thinks they can reach an agreement with the Senate.
    Still, the Ohio Republican said, the House position is clear.

    "You can't control the problem without first strengthening the borders and beginning to enforce the laws," said Mr. Boehner.
    Mr. Bush last week called the Senate measure "a good immigration bill." He also recently reversed his administration's earlier position and now endorses the idea of a path to citizenship for some illegal aliens.
    He said any final bill must include border security, employer sanctions, a temporary-worker program and a way to handle the current illegal alien population.
    Rep. Jack Kingston, Georgia Republican, said the House has some areas in common with the Senate, including provisions to build more fencing -- 370 miles in the Senate version and 698 miles in the House version.
    Mr. Kingston said House Republicans are willing to accept a temporary-worker program for future workers but, in exchange, would have to win agreement on delaying it until the borders are secure and adopting some sort of biometric identification card.
    "We think probably we might be able to do something on a temporary visa basis, but where we will have a line in the sand is on the pathway to citizenship, because pathway to citizenship, by almost any angle, leads to somebody's definition of amnesty," he said. "We don't want 'Republican' and 'amnesty' in the same sentence."
    He estimated that there are 180 members of the House "just adamant about no amnesty."
    Although Mr. Bush has generally favored the Senate's approach and has recently said some illegal aliens can gain citizenship, he has been insistent that future foreign workers not have a path to citizenship. That sets up a major conflict with the Senate, where the bill that passed yesterday does grant that right to future workers.
    Mr. Bush did win an unlikely ally in former President Jimmy Carter, a Democrat, who this week said Mr. Bush's efforts to create a right to citizenship have been "quite admirable."

  • #2
    This article is for the antifascists of the world who still claims that house republicans(which is about a group of 50 GOP out of 230 republicans, will murder the president's chance of getting a well deserved victory on immigration, and lets not forget that the president is A GOP, NOT A DEMOCRATS...Ive always said that because the president is a republican, there is no way the party will allow 50 members to speak for the entire republican base and disrespect the president..Its one thing when you get shut out by democrats, but its very mind boggling to get slap by a small angry group in your party.

    --------------------------------------


    House GOP expected to yield on legislation
    By Stephen Dinan
    THE WASHINGTON TIMES
    May 26, 2006


    The House is the only obstacle that stands between President Bush and a comprehensive immigration bill, and the White House yesterday predicted that the chamber's Republicans will give in.
    White House press secretary Tony Snow said House Republicans will want to pass border security badly enough to back down from the fight against what many consider amnesty for illegal aliens, knowing there is a "heavier political price for failing to act, than for acting."
    "If you are a Republican member of Congress and you're concerned about illegal immigration, do you really want to say to your constituents: You know, I'm going to wait a couple of years before I take up the issue of people knowingly hiring illegal aliens, I want to wait a couple of years before I go ahead and try to identify who the illegal aliens are, I want to wait a couple of years before I start grappling with what to do with these 11 or 12 million people who are here illegally," Mr. Snow said.
    A president always has the most influence in the backroom House-Senate negotiations, but yesterday, Mr. Snow wouldn't tip the administration's hand when asked how they would approach the conference committee.
    "At this point, let's get a bill through the Senate, let's figure out where the fault lines are," he said.
    But those fault lines between the House and Senate are fairly public, deep and fundamental.
    The House passed a bill in December that stepped up border enforcement and interior enforcement, enabled local law enforcement in border areas to help enforce immigration laws and cracked down on employers who hired illegal aliens.
    The Senate included some of those measures but put far more emphasis on future foreign workers and a pathway to citizenship for the current estimated 10 million to 12 million illegal aliens, a move House Republicans consider an unacceptable amnesty.
    "If both parties in a negotiation are running the other way, they will never meet in any middle," said Don Stewart, spokesman for Sen. John Cornyn, Texas Republican.
    "The question for the House is some agreement to do more than just border security. The question for the Senate is: Are they willing to be less generous than the Senate bill? Without a yes on both of those two questions, there's no point in the conference going forward."
    From the House side, Majority Leader John A. Boehner acknowledged there were "two very separate and distinct directions that we're going," but said he still thinks they can reach an agreement with the Senate.
    Still, the Ohio Republican said, the House position is clear.

    "You can't control the problem without first strengthening the borders and beginning to enforce the laws," said Mr. Boehner.
    Mr. Bush last week called the Senate measure "a good immigration bill." He also recently reversed his administration's earlier position and now endorses the idea of a path to citizenship for some illegal aliens.
    He said any final bill must include border security, employer sanctions, a temporary-worker program and a way to handle the current illegal alien population.
    Rep. Jack Kingston, Georgia Republican, said the House has some areas in common with the Senate, including provisions to build more fencing -- 370 miles in the Senate version and 698 miles in the House version.
    Mr. Kingston said House Republicans are willing to accept a temporary-worker program for future workers but, in exchange, would have to win agreement on delaying it until the borders are secure and adopting some sort of biometric identification card.
    "We think probably we might be able to do something on a temporary visa basis, but where we will have a line in the sand is on the pathway to citizenship, because pathway to citizenship, by almost any angle, leads to somebody's definition of amnesty," he said. "We don't want 'Republican' and 'amnesty' in the same sentence."
    He estimated that there are 180 members of the House "just adamant about no amnesty."
    Although Mr. Bush has generally favored the Senate's approach and has recently said some illegal aliens can gain citizenship, he has been insistent that future foreign workers not have a path to citizenship. That sets up a major conflict with the Senate, where the bill that passed yesterday does grant that right to future workers.
    Mr. Bush did win an unlikely ally in former President Jimmy Carter, a Democrat, who this week said Mr. Bush's efforts to create a right to citizenship have been "quite admirable."

    Comment


    • #3
      Lets dissect this article and let me point out a few explosive threat that were made in this rticle.
      --


      White House press secretary Tony Snow
      said House Republicans will want to pass border security badly enough to back down from the fight against what many consider amnesty for illegal aliens, knowing there is a "heavier political price for failing to act, than for acting."
      ----
      This quote above is exactly what ive always talked about...i believe the senate bill will be rewritten, but nothing in the guest worker will change, at least nothing important...The bill will be tronger on border enforcement and the ultimadum will be " get a strong enforement+guest worker program or you WONT GET ANYTHING" and this will be a decision that will be hard for all GOP facing re election to make.\

      Just like snmow concluded, they will definatly yield and i dont see them stick to this enforcment-only approach..everyone knows that they will have to give up this extreme hardline or the democrats will take over.

      Comment


      • #4
        Dream on, guys. It's not gonna happen!!

        Comment


        • #5
          there is a "heavier political price for failing to act, than for acting."
          ---

          Quotes by press secretary tony snow ..and let me say that i couldnt agree with him anymore...At the end of the day, members of the senate will not face re election whyle 2/3 of the house will...At the end of the day, the senate holds all the good cards because they COULD EASILY HOLD THEIR GROUND AND WIT THEM OUT.

          MY PREDICTION IS, THE HOUSE WILL BREAK AS THE NOVEMBER ELECTIONS GETS NEAR...THOSE MEMBERS MIGHT SAY ON TV THAT THEY WONT ACCEPT ENFORCMENT + GUEST WORKER, BUT DEEP DOWN, YOU KNOW THEY JUST WANT TO GET SOME TYPE OF ENFORCMENT SIGN INTO LAW AND MOVE ON..

          senate hold a major advantage.

          Comment


          • #6
            In the last analysis, House has an option not to name conferees at all and INSTEAD attach ENFORCEMENT ONLY Bill to one of the "MUST PASS" Bills (Appropriations Bill) and have it passed before November.

            So, if they really want "Enforcement ONLY" they will get it.

            Moreover, I think it's in the interests of immigrants that House does just that: to pass extremely anti-immigrant Bill is the best way to accelerate the passage of full amnesty - which will become inevitable once the impact of too extreme measures felt all accross.

            Regards,

            IE

            Comment


            • #7
              I found this on the GOP website.... have a look
              http://www.gop.com/News/Read.aspx?ID=6348

              Comment


              • #8
                I am sure they'll pass the bill with some kind of amnesty, because it is too dangerous to leave 12 million illegals stay in shadows.

                Imagine for a moment what's going to happen if there will be no amnesty...in particular, imagine how illegals will react! 12 million pist off, dangerous, undocumented 'felons' with no identity and no hope...What do you think they will do? Go home? I don't think so!!!

                Comment


                • #9

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    mpodcsin has a good point. Do you remember the Los Angeles riots in the 90's?
                    I could see that this could lead to an angry mass of people. The question is.... does the House care? *G*

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      I found this on the GOP website.... have a look
                      http://www.gop.com/News/Read.aspx?ID=6348

                      WASHINGTON - Sharing none of the Senate's euphoria over its immigration plan, the congressman expected to be the House's lead negotiator made clear Friday that he will not accept any deal that includes an offer of citizenship for millions of illegal immigrants.

                      A day after the Senate adopted an overhaul that both toughens enforcement and loosens immigration laws, House Judiciary Committee Chairman James Sensenbrenner predicted choppy negotiations ahead.

                      "I would like to see a bill passed and signed into law. However, I'm a realist," the Wisconsin Republican said. "And given the fact the Senate and the House started miles apart, and as a result of some amendments that were offered in the Senate miles have become moons apart or oceans apart, this has made a difficult task even more so."

                      http://www.contracostatimes.com/mld/...cctimes_nation

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        I am sure they'll pass the bill with some kind of amnesty, because it is too dangerous to leave 12 million illegals stay in shadows.
                        The thing is that those who most adamantly oppose Guest Worker/background check program (and thus in fact persist in keeping the illegals in shadows) are the ones who claim that those 12 million illegals are too dangerous for the Security and Safety of public and must be officially declared to be felons, while openly admitting that it is not logistically possible to round up and jail 12 million people at once.

                        Now that is funny!

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          so what do you propose exactly antifacist1? just curious...

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Antifascist1 , Posted May 12, 2006 11:00 PM

                            http://discuss.ilw.com/eve/forums/a/...1010595521/p/8

                            1. What is the goal that needs to be achieved?
                            That is the FIRST question you must ask yourself

                            Second question is HOW TO PRACTICALLY ACHIEVE IT?

                            Suppose we all agree that flow of illegal immigration is bad for US.
                            So, let's all support measures to take care of it - let's all agree to commit certain portion
                            of taxes to be allocated for Border Protection activities.

                            Next we have 12 million illegal people present here.
                            What is to be done about them?
                            Deport them all?
                            Ok, how much it costs?
                            How much can be committed to enforce deportation?
                            How many can be deported?
                            How many will leave voluntarily if Interior Enforcement increased?
                            And what to do with those who will still remain?

                            These are questions that could be debated and acted upon in rational manner, not in the heat of passion...


                            2. Antifascist1 , Posted May 02, 2006 04:31 PM

                            http://discuss.ilw.com/eve/forums/a/...1010595521/p/7

                            Ideally, the best solution would:

                            1. Increase Border Protection , do everything possible to halt the future flow of illegal immigrants.

                            2. Intelligent group of Interior enforcement veterans ,economists and political advisers should estimate :

                            a) How much resourses can US commit to interior enforcement ( f.e. $$$ XX).

                            b) How many individuals would that amount of resourses allow to apprehend and deport ($$$*** divided the $ cost per apprehension/detention/deportation).

                            c) How many individuals would not be possible to detain/deport ? ( Number derived from b : Total number of undocumented population minus the number that resourses would allow to deport ).

                            3. Enact "Temporary Guest Worker" program for undocumented population that would set piorities whereby:

                            a) Those who fail to pass initial screening (criminal/health related) are removed as soon as practically possible

                            b) Most of those who entered country recently/have no roots and can be deported ( per estimate of the costs and resourses available) be forced to leave at the end of such temporary period.

                            c) Remaining number ( no health/criminal risk + long term established roots/humanitarian grounds and etc.) are allowed to apply for permanent residence after meeting strict eligibility requirements.

                            [Looks almost like Hagel-Martinez compromise, but based on hard numbers ( feasibility, cost, resourses available and etc. rather than arbitrary wish].

                            Comment

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