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  • National Origins Act

    National Origins Act
    The National Origins Act was a discriminatory U.S. immigration law passed in 1924. It established admission quotas and was designed to curtail immigration from new source countries such as Russia, Poland, and Italy by allocating them small quotas; it allowed immigration from older source countries, such as England, by allocating them large quotas. Initially the quotas were set at 2 percent of a country's foreign-born residents in the United States in 1890. In 1929 quotas were apportioned according to the national origins or roots of the total U.S. population, enlarging England's quota. The legislation included a clause that completely barred immigration for all those prohibited from attaining U.S. citizenship, specifically, Asians.

    Racist arguments permeated the debates over the act. Potential East European Jewish immigrants were characterized in some government documents as "abnormally twisted." The most racist part of the act was the clause barring Asian immigration. It was aimed at potential Japanese immigrants"”Chinese laborers had already been barred by the Chinese Exclusion Act of 1882. The 1924 legislation, often known as the Japanese Exclusion Act, blocked growth of the Japanese community in the United States by banning immigration and freezing the gender imbalance. Japanese immigrants had initially been almost all men, but an increasing number of Japanese women had migrated to the United States as wives and picture brides in the 1910s, enabling community growth through procreation. Further correction of the gender imbalance through immigration of women was blocked by the act.

    The national origins quota system was abolished in 1965. Since then countries in the Eastern Hemisphere have been allocated equal quotas. Since 1976 countries in the Western Hemisphere have been limited to the same per-country quotas as those applied in the Eastern Hemisphere.

  • #2
    National Origins Act
    The National Origins Act was a discriminatory U.S. immigration law passed in 1924. It established admission quotas and was designed to curtail immigration from new source countries such as Russia, Poland, and Italy by allocating them small quotas; it allowed immigration from older source countries, such as England, by allocating them large quotas. Initially the quotas were set at 2 percent of a country's foreign-born residents in the United States in 1890. In 1929 quotas were apportioned according to the national origins or roots of the total U.S. population, enlarging England's quota. The legislation included a clause that completely barred immigration for all those prohibited from attaining U.S. citizenship, specifically, Asians.

    Racist arguments permeated the debates over the act. Potential East European Jewish immigrants were characterized in some government documents as "abnormally twisted." The most racist part of the act was the clause barring Asian immigration. It was aimed at potential Japanese immigrants"”Chinese laborers had already been barred by the Chinese Exclusion Act of 1882. The 1924 legislation, often known as the Japanese Exclusion Act, blocked growth of the Japanese community in the United States by banning immigration and freezing the gender imbalance. Japanese immigrants had initially been almost all men, but an increasing number of Japanese women had migrated to the United States as wives and picture brides in the 1910s, enabling community growth through procreation. Further correction of the gender imbalance through immigration of women was blocked by the act.

    The national origins quota system was abolished in 1965. Since then countries in the Eastern Hemisphere have been allocated equal quotas. Since 1976 countries in the Western Hemisphere have been limited to the same per-country quotas as those applied in the Eastern Hemisphere.

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    • #3
      Same ol..

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