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  • Abandoned Green Card

    If a parent of a USC abandons his/her green card, can s/he get a visit visa B1/B2 on a later date if s/he wants to visit his/her child?

  • #2
    If a parent of a USC abandons his/her green card, can s/he get a visit visa B1/B2 on a later date if s/he wants to visit his/her child?

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    • #3
      yes, normal conditions for tourist visa apply.

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      • #4
        But can the consular officer still refuse the visa on (212 B) "Immigrant Intent" section?

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        • #5
          yes

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          • #6
            But will it not be funny to tell a person that you have an "immigrant intent", who already has surrendered, his/her green card?

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            • #7
              <BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by Young Man:
              But will it not be funny to tell a person that you have an "immigrant intent", who already has surrendered, his/her green card? </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

              As I see it, it all depends on circumstences: why one returned GC?
              Maybe that person left the USA without a re-entry permit, and realized too late that he/she can't return after 13 months. All he/she can do is to return GC and go through the immigration process again. Visitor visa would make it faster to come to the USA again...
              Or, let's say we talk about the spouse of USC here, and USC still lives in the USA..
              It would be a different story if that ex-PR/USC couple lives together in foreign country, and wants to visit the USA..

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              • #8
                Thank you so much aneri, your attitude is very rational and your answers very logical. Please tell me if the PR returns the GC to the consulate before the one year expiry date, then what do you think? As a matter of fact a friend of mine wants to go back to his previous home (The country of his birth) but wants to come back every couple of years for a few weeks to visit his daughter. Also note that he had visited the US on a B1/B2 visa thrice before he got his GC. And he got his GC by consular processing not by adjustment of status, although he had a valid visitors visa even at the time of his consular processing.

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                • #9
                  Your Comments are awaited.

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                  • #10
                    <BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by Young Man:
                    Please tell me if the PR returns the GC to the consulate before the one year expiry date, then what do you think? As a matter of fact a friend of mine wants to go back to his previous home (The country of his birth) but wants to come back every couple of years for a few weeks to visit his daughter. Also note that he had visited the US on a B1/B2 visa thrice before he got his GC. And he got his GC by consular processing not by adjustment of status, although he had a valid visitors visa even at the time of his consular processing. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>
                    What do you think? Would you grant him a visitor visa?

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                    • #11
                      You have thrown ball in my court. You are a senior member and in a better position to answer. As far as I am concerened, since I know the fellow and I know he is right so I will grant him a visitors Visa. But what about the consular officer?

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                      • #12
                        <BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by Young Man:
                        As far as I am concerened, since I know the fellow and I know he is right so I will grant him a visitors Visa. But what about the consular officer? </div></BLOCKQUOTE>
                        I don't believe consular officers or any other immig. officers are there to "screw" our lives or plans, as long as we are honest about them... and they are in the accordance with a letter and a spirit of the law.

                        Based on the information you provided, and assuming that your friend has established some ties (employment?)in his home country after returning from the USA, I think he has a very good chances to be granted a visitor visa.
                        <BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by Young Man:
                        You are a senior member and in a better position to answer? </div></BLOCKQUOTE> number of posts hardly says anything about the quality of the information provided... but thanks anyway

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                        • #13
                          Thanks a lot aneri, for your help.

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                          • #14
                            <BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">As a matter of fact a friend of mine wants to go back to his previous home (The country of his birth) but wants to come back every couple of years for a few weeks to visit his daughter. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

                            Unless she is already grown up, he will need to visit her far more often than that if he wants to be a father to her.
                            Have a nice day

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