Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Honest Qustion about national origin

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Honest Qustion about national origin

    How big of a role does an alien's national origin play in his/her chances of adjusting status without problems? For sake of discussion lets say through marriage. I don't mean in terms of laws. I mean in terms of real life. Immigration officers are human and I'm sure that many of them have prejudices and faults just like anyone else. Do you think that people from cetain countries are scrutinezed less than people from other countries? Do you think that male aliens married to female USCs are treated differently than female aliens married to male USCs?
    Have a nice day

  • #2
    How big of a role does an alien's national origin play in his/her chances of adjusting status without problems? For sake of discussion lets say through marriage. I don't mean in terms of laws. I mean in terms of real life. Immigration officers are human and I'm sure that many of them have prejudices and faults just like anyone else. Do you think that people from cetain countries are scrutinezed less than people from other countries? Do you think that male aliens married to female USCs are treated differently than female aliens married to male USCs?
    Have a nice day

    Comment


    • #3
      I'd guess, based on the experiences of a couple of highly educated women I know who married third world men that what matters most is the discrepancy in education and "status". One woman, a Ph.D., went to Turkey and married an attractive guy without much education (she was pretty homely as well). As far as I know, they're still married and living here. Another (a blonde attractive woman working on a master's) married an Egyptian in Egypt and brought him home. They'd been living together in Egypt, and had a big wedding there. He was college educated. They came back here, no problem.

      Comment


      • #4
        From my experience I think I've been treated unusually nice because of my skin color. I'm a white Mexican, so when immigration officials look at my papers that say I'm from Mexico, then look at me and say "You don't look Mexican at all!" with a smile on their faces. Which is somthing that kind of disappoints me because I love my dark skinned countrymen and women. I suppose that is something I have in my favor but it tells you of the prejudices immigration officials have.

        Something else you might notice is that immigration officials with latino descent are more ruthless to other latinos than caucasian officials. Which is kind of ironic. This from my experience travelling to and from the U.S.

        Comment


        • #5
          Hi all,

          I would like to add my own contribution to this matter. I do not mean to offend anybody, you are right Gluhbirne. The whole immigration system is not set up for some people.

          If you are from countries like UK, western europe, Canada etc., you are very welcome.

          If you are from third world countries like African countries or arab countries, well you are a treated as a piece of shiet. I am saying it because I am experiencing it. I will just give you an example: after waiting for 16 months for my interview, I went to the local office to check on the status of my case, the lady told me that I had to wait for FBI clearance. And I asked how long does it take since I would like to have an idea so that I can organize accordingly. She said forever. At the same time, a friend of mine from Norway submitted his case 5 months after I submitted mine. And guess what? He had his interview without the security check. He was told that the will send him his card once they receive the FBI clearance.

          What is wrong with this system?

          Comment


          • #6
            >If you are from third world countries like >African countries or arab countries

            That's because fraud is HIGH in those countries. Also those countries don't allow immigration, so every citizen winds up being a SINGLE race (and they call US racist?).

            When every country in the world starts letting in immigrations of every other country -- the whole world will be one big melting pot and there won't be any racism. Until that happens (good luck) -- every country will have pretty much similar patterns of behaviour and cultures.

            -= nav =-

            Comment


            • #7
              Yeah, high fraud areas come under greater scrutiny. I'd like to see and compare the approval percentages for I-601 waivers in Mexico, Western Europe, and China. Anyone want to bet against China having the lowest approval rate? What might fly in a waiver case in Europe or Mexico won't get off the ground in China.

              Comment


              • #8
                Why not just subject the applicants to lie detector test ? It'll help to determine if they lie or not

                Comment


                • #9
                  No matter what the opinions of the immigration inspectors, when you come down to it, most legal immigration to the US is from Latin America or Asia, NOT Europe or Britain or Australia. Come to that--these countries have a large number of nonwhites, so I'd say it's "racist" to claim that immigration from those countries is necessarily white.

                  Also, if you're speaking of Third World countries, many would-be immigrants simply don't have the education or skills to get an employment visa, or to support a family petition. That's the fault of the sending country, and that sometimes due to racism in the sending country, such as Mexico. Can the white Mexican writing above truthfully say he/she isn't treated better in Mexico than, say, someone of pure Indian origin? And is economically better off and less likely to have the intent of staying illegally if they come to the U.S. because of his/her privileged position in his/her own society?

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Alex-p--You can blame part of the immigration inspectors' comments to the diligent work of your countrymen and -women in the U.S. Hispanics used to be considered "white" here, until it became beneficial to claim minority status, and the term "Hispanic" was born. Since then, ethnic lobbies have spent a great deal of time and effort rallying for "brown" rights and political power, while terming every Hispanic or Latino as "brown". Some of those yelling the loudest are of European origin.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Moondin--actually you get a lot of shades of color in the Arab world, ranging from red headed Berbers (who aren't strictly Arabs, but live in N. Africa) to blonde Lebanese to black Emiratis or Egyptians. Lots of trading, conquests, and traffic (i.e., crusades) in that area, and have been for centuries. See too a book by Bernard Lewis, "Race and Color in Islam".

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        We have not yet dealt face to face with any INS employees, so I haven't noticed anything personally. I just asked the question to see how different people perceive thier different experiences. I can see where prejudices that a person might have would probably affect his/her job in some way, even if he/she tried very hard not to let them. I don't mean to criticize or anything. I mean, if I were an INS employee, I would probably be more skeptical of a 50 year old woman married to a 30 year old man than of a 50 year old man married to a 30 year old woman, even though I would try not to be.
                        Have a nice day

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          It would be politically correct to be color blind in some situation, but say hypothetically a person like Richard Reid (the infamous "Shoe Bomber") applies for US immigration benefits. He is a British citizen, I'm sure is paper work would seem perfectly fine, but I would certainly hope the USCIS interview notice that the guy doesn't exactly look like a Briton named Richard Reid, and would interrogate him to get all the real facts.

                          Political correctness is nice, but it should have it limits.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Prefential treatment according to race is unjustified regardless of the case. Racial profiling is a big negative in this country. Unfortunately, I don't think USCIS play by the same book with other law enforcement agency, and even them do racial profile despite their denial and contradiction.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Racial profiling is one thing, statistics is another. If visitors from certain countries, or with certain characteristics have violated their visas, or entered illegally at a significantly higher rate than other countries, then I'd be a fool not to look at them more closely. Race is one of those characteristics, as far as it's linked to nationality.

                              Sure, it would be nice if the State Dept. and immigration authorities could actually go into depth with every applicant from every country. But if you think the wait is long and the fees are high now... By the way, blonde, blue-eyed Poles have a hard time getting visas because of the high rate of overstays from Poland.

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X