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  • Dont know if I am a citizen

    my friends sister is wondering if she is a citizen. Her parents filed for citizenship when she was 17 yrs. (this happened around 25 yrs ago). They are married. Her mother recieved her citizenship first but her father recieved it 4 months later and by this time she is over 18yrs all. How can she find out if she is a citizen-would the FOIA have this info. She has recieved conflicting info from different sources-some saying that both your parents have to be a citizen in order to pass it on to you and the fact that she was over 18 when her dad recieved his citizenship-therefore she is not. Three of her siblingsd later recieved their citizenship through her parents but they were all under 18 at the time. Thanks for the reply.

  • #2
    my friends sister is wondering if she is a citizen. Her parents filed for citizenship when she was 17 yrs. (this happened around 25 yrs ago). They are married. Her mother recieved her citizenship first but her father recieved it 4 months later and by this time she is over 18yrs all. How can she find out if she is a citizen-would the FOIA have this info. She has recieved conflicting info from different sources-some saying that both your parents have to be a citizen in order to pass it on to you and the fact that she was over 18 when her dad recieved his citizenship-therefore she is not. Three of her siblingsd later recieved their citizenship through her parents but they were all under 18 at the time. Thanks for the reply.

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    • #3
      USC Sometimes Ask the very Same question, considering The Ways things Once were!

      USC and Legal, Honest Immigrant Alike Must Fight Against Those That Deceive and Disrupt A Place Of Desirability! All Are Victims of Fraud, Both USC and Honest Immigrant Alike! The bad can and does make it more difficult for the good! Be careful who y

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      • #4
        <BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by circle:
        my friends sister is wondering if she is a citizen. Her parents filed for citizenship when she was 17 yrs. (this happened around 25 yrs ago). They are married. Her mother recieved her citizenship first but her father recieved it 4 months later and by this time she is over 18yrs all. How can she find out if she is a citizen-would the FOIA have this info. She has recieved conflicting info from different sources-some saying that both your parents have to be a citizen in order to pass it on to you and the fact that she was over 18 when her dad recieved his citizenship-therefore she is not. Three of her siblingsd later recieved their citizenship through her parents but they were all under 18 at the time. Thanks for the reply. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

        Only one parent needs to be a USC to apply for children. Are her parents still alive? I would hope they know what her status is. If she was included on her mom's application for citizenship, she should have received derivative citizenship when her mom was approved.

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        • #5
          If you talk to any of the USCIS person he/she will start from the beging. from the date of arrival of her parents to dig out the file...
          along with there Natualization Certificate # date and place of issuance.

          Just to make sure her name was in the Form N-400 at that time most of the parents have not inculded the names of there childern in the past.
          At the same time she must have her old Passports to show the arrival in to US.

          Like ProudUSC said Provided her name was inculed at the time of Naturalization and the child was in the U.S. at that time...
          You still need to proof from USCIS to apply for the U.S. Passport.
          Which is under the U.S. Department of State....

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          • #6
            Ahhhh yesssss!!! Finally!!! Many Are Either Begginers, Moderates, Advanced Practicers Of Law!!! Of Coarse Thee Occasional Pretender.
            USC and Legal, Honest Immigrant Alike Must Fight Against Those That Deceive and Disrupt A Place Of Desirability! All Are Victims of Fraud, Both USC and Honest Immigrant Alike! The bad can and does make it more difficult for the good! Be careful who y

            Comment


            • #7
              <BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by ProudUSC:
              <BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by circle:
              my friends sister is wondering if she is a citizen. Her parents filed for citizenship when she was 17 yrs. (this happened around 25 yrs ago). They are married. Her mother recieved her citizenship first but her father recieved it 4 months later and by this time she is over 18yrs all. How can she find out if she is a citizen-would the FOIA have this info. She has recieved conflicting info from different sources-some saying that both your parents have to be a citizen in order to pass it on to you and the fact that she was over 18 when her dad recieved his citizenship-therefore she is not. Three of her siblingsd later recieved their citizenship through her parents but they were all under 18 at the time. Thanks for the reply. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

              Only one parent needs to be a USC to apply for children. Are her parents still alive? I would hope they know what her status is. If she was included on her mom's application for citizenship, she should have received derivative citizenship when her mom was approved. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

              Her dad is deceased and her mom is alive-she is 76 yrs old and does not remember anything about the application. She was living in the USA when both parents filed for citizenship having lived here since she was 8yrs old. It was yrs later when they were adults that her siblings checked into it and found out they were citizens. Would she be able to find out from foia at Dept of homeland security if she is a citizen. If she files for a passport-what info is needed? Thanks for info

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              • #8
                Easiest way is to apply for a lost certificate and state that you received your citizenship through your parents.

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                • #9
                  Besides filing the N-600 form is there any other way to find out if she was listed on her mother's citizenship application. Would a visit to the immigration center or request to FOIA help her. I guess she did not want to spend the money to N600 only to find out that she is not a citizen-Any suggestions. She does have copies of her parents citizenship papers.

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                  • #10
                    Mother could file a FOIA.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      <BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by circle:
                      Besides filing the N-600 form is there any other way to find out if she was listed on her mother's citizenship application. Would a visit to the immigration center or request to FOIA help her. I guess she did not want to spend the money to N600 only to find out that she is not a citizen-Any suggestions. She does have copies of her parents citizenship papers. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>Please post the exact date of her birthdate followed by what are the exact dates on the Naturalization certificates ?

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                      • #12
                        Because your friend was born before February 27, 2001, and assuming both parents were still married and together, then both parents need to have been naturalized before the 18th birthday for your friend to get derivative citizenship and your friend must apply for citizenship now (Form N-400). If the friend's parents were divorced or separated and she was in her mom's custody, then she is a citizen.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          <BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by Mrs. Mani:
                          Because your friend was born before February 27, 2001, and assuming both parents were still married and together, then both parents need to have been naturalized before the 18th birthday for your friend to get derivative citizenship and your friend must apply for citizenship now (Form N-400). If the friend's parents were divorced or separated and she was in her mom's custody, then she is a citizen. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

                          From:

                          http://immigration.lawyers.com...hip-Issues-6887.html


                          The CCA of 2000 states that a child is automatically a United States citizen when one parent is a United States citizen by birth or naturalization and the child is under 18 and is a lawful permanent resident at the time citizenship occurs. Also, the child must be residing in the United States in the legal and physical custody of the United States citizen parent.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            <BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by ProudUSC:
                            <BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by Mrs. Mani:
                            Because your friend was born before February 27, 2001, and assuming both parents were still married and together, then both parents need to have been naturalized before the 18th birthday for your friend to get derivative citizenship and your friend must apply for citizenship now (Form N-400). If the friend's parents were divorced or separated and she was in her mom's custody, then she is a citizen. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

                            From:

                            http://immigration.lawyers.com...hip-Issues-6887.html


                            The CCA of 2000 states that a child is automatically a United States citizen when one parent is a United States citizen by birth or naturalization and the child is under 18 and is a lawful permanent resident at the time citizenship occurs. Also, the child must be residing in the United States in the legal and physical custody of the United States citizen parent. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

                            Proud,

                            the law came into effect feb 2001 and it is not relative to this case.

                            <span class="ev_code_RED">"Her parents filed for citizenship when she was 17 yrs. (this happened around 25 yrs ago). "</span>

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              <BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by 4now:
                              <BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by ProudUSC:
                              <BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by Mrs. Mani:
                              Because your friend was born before February 27, 2001, and assuming both parents were still married and together, then both parents need to have been naturalized before the 18th birthday for your friend to get derivative citizenship and your friend must apply for citizenship now (Form N-400). If the friend's parents were divorced or separated and she was in her mom's custody, then she is a citizen. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

                              From:

                              http://immigration.lawyers.com...hip-Issues-6887.html


                              The CCA of 2000 states that a child is automatically a United States citizen when one parent is a United States citizen by birth or naturalization and the child is under 18 and is a lawful permanent resident at the time citizenship occurs. Also, the child must be residing in the United States in the legal and physical custody of the United States citizen parent. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

                              Proud,

                              the law came into effect feb 2001 and it is not relative to this case.

                              <span class="ev_code_RED">"Her parents filed for citizenship when she was 17 yrs. (this happened around 25 yrs ago). "</span> </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

                              Sorry. I thought only one parent had to be a USC or naturalized citizen for the under 18 child to get derivative status.

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