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  • Oath Ceremony

    Do kids under 18 attend the oath ceremony of their parents? The invitation says if you are filing on behalf of your child they need to be present. My son is 17. Please advise!

  • #2
    Do kids under 18 attend the oath ceremony of their parents? The invitation says if you are filing on behalf of your child they need to be present. My son is 17. Please advise!

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    • #3
      OK, I have spent 4 hours searching the internet and immigration forums. I couldn't find one useful answer to my question. Anyone has a clue?

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      • #4
        Bouree found this:

        Citizenship of Applicant's Children

        If a parent who is applying for naturalization expects to be naturalized
        before any of his or her children reaches age 18, it is likely that such
        children who are living in the United States will automatically become
        citizens. This would happen if the children's other parent already is a
        citizen, or is deceased, or if both parents are naturalized at the same
        time, or if the parents are legally separated and the parent being
        naturalized has the legal custody of the children, or if the parent
        being naturalized is the mother of the children and the children were
        born out of wedlock.

        These children may obtain certificates of citizenship in their own
        names, showing that they became citizens on the same date that the
        parent was naturalized, by filing Form N-600, "Application for
        Certificate of Citizenship," in accordance with instructions on the
        form. The application must be filed after the naturalization of the
        parent(s). A fee is required and must be submitted with the application.
        No currency should be sent in the mail. The children involved who are
        over age 14 will appear before the naturalization examiner and must take
        the same oath of allegiance as is required of persons who naturalize.

        Source and more info
        -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
        God Bless America - God Bless Immigrants - God Bless Poor Misguided Souls Too

        National Domestic Violence Hotline:
        1.800.799.SAFE (7233) 1.800.787.

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        • #5
          Sprint_Girl07,

          I love you!

          What if my son goes automatically for the passport without obtaining Certificate of Citizenship, will he still need to appear infront of a naturalization examiner?

          It seems confusing, that a child could become a citizen either with or without oath!!!!!

          Also, I read somewhere that they may not hand you your certificate on the same day you take the oath and they could mail it later to you. Is that right?

          I also read you don't sign your day to day signature on the certificate but rather your full name in cursive. Is that right?

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          • #6
            Could someone please answer my questions! Me and my wife are having our oath ceremony coming up and we need to know whether it is mandatory to bring along our son who is 16 or could we naturalize ourselves first then apply for his passport later on.

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            • #7
              not sure on the situation, but to be safe yeah take him with you... then apply for passport...

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              • #8
                <BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by bouree:
                Could someone please answer my questions! Me and my wife are having our oath ceremony coming up and we need to know whether it is mandatory to bring along our son who is 16 or could we naturalize ourselves first then apply for his passport later on. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

                a child becomes USC the day his/her parents naturalize by virtue of law (under some conditions: living with parent, permanent resident...).

                davdah, I don't understand your response. Can you give an example when a parent would file for a child to become naturalized? (except when USC lives abroad and adopts a child?)

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                • #9
                  <BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by davdah:
                  If only one of the child's parents naturalizes and the other remains a
                  permanent resident, the child does not derive citizenship. Instead, the
                  citizen parent may file a separate Application for Naturalization (N-
                  400) on behalf of the child ... </div></BLOCKQUOTE> Not exactly (child can become a citizen even when only one parent naturalizes) but I get the idea.

                  However, that's not the case with OP. My understanding is that both parents will soon be naturalized, and there was no reason for them to apply for son's naturalization (or on his behalf).

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                  • #10
                    bouree, I say your son does not need to go to the oath ceremony... But, I think it would be great if he does go. It's once in a life-time event, and he wan't have his own ceremony. It is normal that the family members attend.

                    If you want to make sure whether he is required to come, call your local USCIS office.

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                    • #11
                      Children GO!!!!
                      USC and Legal, Honest Immigrant Alike Must Fight Against Those That Deceive and Disrupt A Place Of Desirability! All Are Victims of Fraud, Both USC and Honest Immigrant Alike! The bad can and does make it more difficult for the good! Be careful who y

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