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Is this what our founding Father's intended?

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  • Is this what our founding Father's intended?

    Last week I met a Korean lady, who just got her green card. She applied from Korea 3 1/2 years ago. It took her only 3 months to get a student visa, she's 41 years old. She then applied for her husband, and 3 children. The whole family came here shortly thereafter.

    All 5 of them now have green cards, and intend to sponsor their 4 parents, siblings and their spouses, who also have children.

    They're all very happy to be here in America, and all are living the American dream, in Korea Town. They eat at Korean restaurants, and speak Korean 99.9% of the time. They are all very nice people who will soon become proud American citizens. They are very motivated to make money, and become American citizens....but they are not interested in becoming American.

    Is this what our founding Father's intended?

    "In the first place, we should insist that if the immigrant who comes here in good faith becomes an American and assimilates himself to us, he shall be treated on an exact equality with everyone else, for it is an outrage to discriminate against any such man because of creed, or birthplace, or origin. But this is predicated upon the person's becoming in every facet an American, and nothing but an American...There can be no divided allegiance here. Any man who says he is an American, but something else also, isn't an American at all. We have room for but one flag, the American flag... We have room for but one language here, and that is the English language... and we have room for but one sole loyalty and that is a loyalty to the American people."
    Theodore Roosevelt 1907

  • #2
    Last week I met a Korean lady, who just got her green card. She applied from Korea 3 1/2 years ago. It took her only 3 months to get a student visa, she's 41 years old. She then applied for her husband, and 3 children. The whole family came here shortly thereafter.

    All 5 of them now have green cards, and intend to sponsor their 4 parents, siblings and their spouses, who also have children.

    They're all very happy to be here in America, and all are living the American dream, in Korea Town. They eat at Korean restaurants, and speak Korean 99.9% of the time. They are all very nice people who will soon become proud American citizens. They are very motivated to make money, and become American citizens....but they are not interested in becoming American.

    Is this what our founding Father's intended?

    "In the first place, we should insist that if the immigrant who comes here in good faith becomes an American and assimilates himself to us, he shall be treated on an exact equality with everyone else, for it is an outrage to discriminate against any such man because of creed, or birthplace, or origin. But this is predicated upon the person's becoming in every facet an American, and nothing but an American...There can be no divided allegiance here. Any man who says he is an American, but something else also, isn't an American at all. We have room for but one flag, the American flag... We have room for but one language here, and that is the English language... and we have room for but one sole loyalty and that is a loyalty to the American people."
    Theodore Roosevelt 1907

    Comment


    • #3
      <BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by unique:
      Last week I met a Korean lady, who just got her green card. She applied from Korea 3 1/2 years ago. It took her only 3 months to get a student visa, she's 41 years old. She then applied for her husband, and 3 children. The whole family came here shortly thereafter.

      All 5 of them now have green cards, and intend to sponsor their 4 parents, siblings and their spouses, who also have children.

      They're all very happy to be here in America, and all are living the American dream, in Korea Town. They eat at Korean restaurants, and speak Korean 99.9% of the time. They are all very nice people who will soon become proud American citizens. They are very motivated to make money, and become American citizens....but they are not interested in becoming American.

      Is this what our founding Father's intended?

      "In the first place, we should insist that if the immigrant who comes here in good faith becomes an American and assimilates himself to us, he shall be treated on an exact equality with everyone else, for it is an outrage to discriminate against any such man because of creed, or birthplace, or origin. But this is predicated upon the person's becoming in every facet an American, and nothing but an American...There can be no divided allegiance here. Any man who says he is an American, but something else also, isn't an American at all. We have room for but one flag, the American flag... We have room for but one language here, and that is the English language... and we have room for but one sole loyalty and that is a loyalty to the American people."
      Theodore Roosevelt 1907 </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

      I know someone, of German decent, born here and third generation American. It was his grandfather that was the actual immigrant from Germany. This person is still associating himself with Germans.

      I know of many more people, Italian, Russian, Spain, etc., etc. that behave the very same.

      Integration is a very noble thought, but if the laws don't match up you have a mess. That is exactly what we have.
      “...I may condemn what you say, but I will give my life for that you may say it”! - Voltaire

      Comment


      • #4
        Actually Unique this doesn't only happen in the US.

        This happens in many countries. Very common in families from descents of certain cultures.

        It's like a dual nationality kind of thing. Do certain things the American way, and some of the way from their heritage.

        In UK for example, many families from India, Pakistan, China etc tend to eat mainly dishes from their background countries, use English as their second language at home, often live in areas of the same background cultures and so on.

        I have seen it all over Europe. In fact the Brits maybe even the worse culprits (lol) often they move aboard and look or cook for British food or their favorite Indian curries lol

        They expect everyone to speak English or try little to learn the language. And I am sure English would mostly be the language spoken at home. I know many who have immigrated to various countries and not changed much at all, but consider their new country home and adapt somewhat.

        I know what you are saying, but heritage is still close to heart and don't want to lose that I guess. Look at how many Americans here are Italian or of Italian descent, very common in those families here.
        -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
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        • #5
          What is being an American for the OP? That lady surely speaks English and chooses to speak her native language at home. What is wrong with that? Her children probably speak English (or will learn it soon at school), so she probably doesn’t want them to loose their native language (if they don’t practice daily they will, believe me).

          My native language is Spanish. My husband only speaks English. I talk to my son in Spanish all the time and my husband does the same in English. He is now 2 and guess what? He is bilingual. I don’t see any problem with that. I have American friends but I feel more comfortable with Hispanics and speaking my language because we have more things in common. The same way a highly educated person feels more comfortable speaking with his peers that with a bunch of high school drop outs (or the other way around).

          I prefer to eat my country’s food. I grew up doing it, just like most people like the food his/her mother used to cook. And BTW, what is American food according to you? Burgers, Pizzas and Tacos? Once in a while it’s OK but if you want to be “really” American you are going to end up fat.

          The OP has a very narrow definition of what makes someone American. It seems he believed what Palin said during the campaign: “the real Americans” (in comparison with the “unreal” ones, AKA everyone who disagrees with her).

          Comment


          • #6
            Oh, I forgot. "What was the founding fathers' intention/" is the most stupid way of answering a question. I finished Law School and the "lawmaker's intention" is the last way of interpreting the law. First, it is subjective; second, it is outdated; Third, it is irrelevant.

            You really want to know what the founding fathers were thinking? They wanted a country with slavery (all men created equal really meant all "white men"; in case you didnt know that's what many original documents stated), a country where women couldn't vote (women got the right to vote way later), a country with freedom of religion as long as it was THEIR religion (remember Salem, the scarlett letter and so on), etc.

            The time and place of the founding fathers was different from ours. The reality and the problems are different. Or do you think that when they said "people have the right to bear arms" they thought about the possibility of me having a nuclear missile in my house? It's nonsense.

            Comment


            • #7
              <BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by Cayita:
              Oh, I forgot. "What was the founding fathers' intention/" is the most stupid way of answering a question. I finished Law School and the "lawmaker's intention" is the last way of interpreting the law. First, it is subjective; second, it is outdated; Third, it is irrelevant.
              </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

              You must have gone to a pretty bad law school. The intention of the writers of the Constitution is of paramount importance to the majority of the current Supreme Court. Furthermore, it can not be outdated. IF you pass the bar and get sworn in, you take an oath to uphold it. How can you uphold something that is outdated? Irrelevant? The Constition is the primary source of all our laws. YOU are irrelevant.

              Comment


              • #8
                FYI: you obviously don't know that the Supreme Court has consistently held that the right to bear arms is protected.

                What law school did you go to that you don't know this? Did you pass the bar exam (as I did on the first try)?

                Comment


                • #9
                  No, I'm not trying to pick on Koreans, or that very nice family. I fully understand that this behavior goes on everywhere in the world not just America. No, I'm not a racist, nor do I think that America should consist of only white people. If it were, I'd be the first one to move away.

                  In case any of you failed to read the title of my post and what President Roosevelt wrote, please read it carefully before you criticize. Remember, America is a sovereign nation and does not have to tolerate those who have no interest in becoming American, even though they all want to be Americans. There is a difference.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Deport all those who degrade American values; if can not adopt American values, laws, system you have no room in my country !!!

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Unique

                      I dont much care about the assimilation of these people.

                      I wish to know how is that they came to get greencards? She came on F1 and brought her family under the guise of accompanying her.

                      After that... how did she get a greencard based on what?

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        another example of a lying visa cheat....she told our embassy officials that she would return to Korea after her studies of noodle soup making (or whatever)....instead? Yep...lies....this is why foreign students should be forced to return to their country for two years, no exceptions (unless they invent perpetual motion)..sure, they can do their one year of practical training, afterwards, back home and let their native country gain something from their education.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          <BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by 4now:
                          Unique

                          I dont much care about the assimilation of these people.

                          I wish to know how is that they came to get greencards? She came on F1 and brought her family under the guise of accompanying her.

                          After that... how did she get a greencard based on what? </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

                          May I?

                          The above timeline from F-1 student visa to LPR status within 3.5 years is quite feasible, or comfortable if you will.

                          Here's the scenario:

                          1) The lady consular processed her F-1 (student visa) in Seoul with concurrent F-2 (dependent visas) for husband and kids in June 2005.

                          2) Family landed in the US in September 2005 and the lady started formal schooling.

                          3) Either the wife or husband was employer-petitioned for change of nonimmigrant status from F-1 or F-2 to H-1B in April 2006. (Quite necessary because neither F-1 nor F-2 is a dual-intent visa type for immigrant visa application purposes. Moreover, the H-1B visa lottery chances weren't so stiff yet in 2006-2007 fiscal year).

                          4) The H-1B nonimmigrant status was used as basis for PERM (Laborcert) / I-140 (Immigrant Petition for Alien Worker) applications sometime within years 2007-2008 under EB-2 or Employment-based 2nd Preference for 'Members of the Professions Holding Advanced Degrees or Persons of Exceptional Ability' where Koreans have "C"urrent visa availability.

                          5) Obviously, all applications/petitions have sailed through successfully. And so... Voila! Green cards for the principal applicant and her/his dependents have been issued recently.

                          Oh yeah, three and a half years could be a breeze from start to finish for some!

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            <BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by iperson:
                            4now, any student on F1 can bring his/her family over to the US. The family also receives F1 visas with the student. And when the student adjusts his/her status into LPR, the family is adjusted at the same time.
                            </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

                            to Duh #1
                            @RN Duh #2

                            Ummm....You both would have to be arrogant idiots to think that I wouldnt know that.

                            Didnt you see my post was addressed to "Unique"? However he reported the start and the end of the story, he left out the middle so to speak. I was merely trying to get him to tell the whole story so it didnt look like they just came here as students and voila ... got greencard.

                            it is obvious that both of you need to get grips

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              O my goodness! That makes you the most arrogant idiot ever. What forum rule prevents anyone from giving an opinion to any point in any thread?

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