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  • Conditional Permanent Resident and Student Loans

    When I get my conditional permanent resident card, will it say conditional on it?

    Also, will I be eligible for Student Loans to go to school with the conditional resident card?

    Cathy

    PS Thank all of you who give such wonderful advice on this board!

  • #2
    When I get my conditional permanent resident card, will it say conditional on it?

    Also, will I be eligible for Student Loans to go to school with the conditional resident card?

    Cathy

    PS Thank all of you who give such wonderful advice on this board!

    Comment


    • #3
      I was wondering the same thing for a while now, I got an answer on another board about this, I think it doesn't say conditional on it, the only difference between a real GC and conditional GC should be the expiration date... Again, I am relying on the poster who replied my similar question...

      You should be able to go school, I mean for example if there are conditional permanent residents in several branches of US Armed Forces, why shouldn't you simply go to a school ?

      Good Luck...

      Comment


      • #4
        Here I found the reply of the conditional greencard holder...

        "Bizarrely, It's a Green Card.....but seriously folks it's a standard I-551 (which is a barely green credit card sized piece of plastic). In of itself it's not conditional. The expiry date is two years from the date I set foot in the US as I entered with an immigrant visa so I was adjusted on arrival. The conditional bit is that I must be still married to my wife at the time it expires or I don't get one that's valid for 10 years. It arrived by post about 8 weeks after I got here. You get a stamp in your passport to prove your status up until the GC arrives. The stamp is valid for one year.
        Good Luck "

        Hope it helps...

        Again Good Luck...

        Comment


        • #5
          Thanks guys,

          Has anyone on this board had a Conditional Green Card and applied for student loans? (or know someone who did)

          Cathy

          Comment


          • #6
            The only difference between a conditional green card and the permanant is just the lenght of validity technically.If you check the department of Education site,you'll learn that to be eligible for federal student loans,you have to be permanent resident of the US and be enrolled in the selective service(which should be done automatically by the INS if you are a male under 25).
            So yes you are eligible for federal student loan if you have a conditional green card providing you qualify.After all a conditional GC is just a GC with a validity of 2 years instead of 10

            Comment


            • #7
              Exactly! There is NO difference between a conditional GC and a 'permenant one' other than the expiry date. 2 yrs vs. 10 yrs.

              Comment


              • #8
                I am a conditional gc holder and I have a federal student loan. You have to go to the school that you are going to study and ask for information, they are going to help you through the process of filling your fafsa.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Its true the only differance is Validity 2-10 yrs . sometime INS call the couple for Interview within two years, too. I know many cases.
                  you can still get any kind of loans if qualify.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Yes Cathy, as a Conditional Permanent Resident you are eligible to apply for federal student loans. In general one is eligible for federal student loans if s/he is:

                    --> U.S. Citizen
                    -->U.S. permanent resident who has a I-151, I-551,or I-551C (Alien Registration Receipt Card).
                    -->"Special" Categories For Students
                    If you are not a U.S. citizen or eligible non-citizen, you must have an Arrival-Departure Record (I-94) from the U.S. Immigration and Naturalization Service (INS) showing one of the following designations in order to be eligible:
                    a) "Refugee"
                    b) "Asylum Granted"
                    c) "Indefinite Parole" and/or "Humanitarian Parole"
                    d) "Cuban-Haitian Entrant, Status Pending"
                    e) "Conditional Entrant" (valid only if issued before April 1, 1980)


                    --> International Students
                    There is no State or Federal financial aid available to international undergraduates. F-1 visas allow very limited opportunities with the University for students to work.

                    Students holding J1 or J2 exchange visitor visa or F1 or F2 student visa are NOT eligible for Federal or State aid but may still be considered for departmental awards and alternative loans.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      I have heard also that some states consider a person eligible to establish residency in that state for purposes of being considered for in-state tuition in public and community universities and colleges. For instance the categories of visas that allow an alien without a green card to establish a domicile in the U.S. are:

                      - A visa
                      - E visa
                      - G visa
                      - H-1B, H-1C visa
                      - K visa
                      - L visa
                      - O visa
                      - R visa
                      - T visa
                      - U visa, and
                      - V visa

                      -- Other non-citizens permitted to domicile in the U.S.

                      The following groups may be treated as permanent residents:

                      1. Individuals classified by INS as Refugees, Asylees, Parolees, Conditional Permanent
                      Residents (holding I-551 cards which have not expired), and Temporary Residents
                      (holding I-688, I-688a, or I-688b cards which have not expired).
                      2. Persons holding Temporary Protected Status; and Spouses and Children with approved
                      petitions under the Violence Against Women Act (VAWA) (the I-360); other applicants
                      with an approved I-360, Special Agricultural Workers; individuals granted deferred action
                      status by INS.
                      3. An individual who has filed an application for cancellation of removal or adjustment of
                      status under the Nicaraguan and Central American Relief Act (NACARA), Haitian Refugee Immigrant Fairness Act (HRIFA) or the Cuban Adjustment Act, and has been issued a fee/filing receipt or Notice of Action by INS.
                      4. An individual who has filed for adjustment of status to that of a person admitted for
                      permanent residency under 8 USC 1255; or under the "registry" program (8 USC 1259); or the Special Immigrant Juvenile Program, and has been issued a fee/filing receipt or Notice of Action by INS.



                      Once a non-citizen is eligible for consideration as a permanent resident, he or she must still meet the same criteria as U.S. citizens in order to be considered that state resident. This includes 12 months physical presence in the state for the purpose of making it one's permanent home and gainful employment for 12 months. As soon as a non-citizen acquires the right to be treated as a permanent resident, any time spent in the state for purposes other than to go to college may be counted towards her/his required 12 months
                      presence in the state.


                      Listed below are the sequences that non-citizens aliens must follow to obtain permanent
                      residency when they are sponsored by immediate relatives, other relatives or by employers.
                      House Bill 1403, passed by the 77th Legislature, established an early point in time when an
                      individual applying for permanent residence has a legal right to be treated as a permanent
                      resident. Once a student has proof that s/he has completed submitted the petition step in
                      applying for permanent resident status, he or she s/he has the same right to establish residence
                      as a U.S. citizen or a permanent resident. If the
                      individual has also established a domicile in the state, he or she is a resident.

                      The steps for applying for permanent residency are different for persons being sponsored by an immediate relative, other family members, or by employers; therefore, the point in time when the individual qualifies for residency differs.

                      = Non-Citizens Aliens Sponsored by Immediate Relatives
                      1) U.S. citizen family member files a Petition for Alien Relative (I-130). [Student can
                      be treated as if permanent resident status has been granted.]
                      2) (Optional) INS issues a Notice of Action Taken (I-797), indicating the petition has
                      been approved. (Note: not all INS offices issue the I-797)
                      3) The sponsored non-citizen alien files an Application to Register Permanent
                      Residence or Adjust Status (I-485).
                      4) INS processes the Application.
                      5) INS issues the Alien Resident Receipt Card.

                      = Non-Citizens Aliens Sponsored by Other Relatives
                      1) U.S. citizen family member files a Petition for Alien Relative (I-130). [Student can
                      be treated as if permanent resident status has been granted.]
                      2) (Optional) INS issues a Notice of Action Taken (I-797), indicating the petition has
                      been approved. (Note: not all INS offices issue the I-797)
                      3) The non-citizen alien is placed in a queue, based on her/his "priority date," (the date
                      of his petition) and waits for a visa number to become available through the quota
                      system.
                      4) The priority date reaches the top of the quota queue, and the non-citizen alien
                      acquires a visa number.
                      5) The non-citizen alien files an Application to Register Permanent Residence or Adjust
                      Status (I-485).
                      6) INS processes the Application.
                      7) INS issues the Alien Resident Receipt Card.


                      = Non-Citizens Aliens Sponsored by Employers
                      1) U.S. employer files Labor Certification papers with the U.S. Department of Labor.
                      2) U.S. employer files an Immigrant Petition for Alien Worker (I-140). [Student can be
                      treated as if permanent resident status has been granted.]
                      3) INS issues a Notice of Action Taken (I-797), indicating the petition has been
                      approved.
                      4) The non-citizen alien is placed in a queue, based on her/his "priority date," (the date
                      of her/his petition) and waits for a visa number to become available through the
                      quota system.
                      5) The priority date reaches the top of the quota queue, and the non-citizen alien
                      acquires a visa number.
                      6) The non-citizen alien files an Application to Register Permanent Residence or Adjust
                      Status (I-485).
                      7) INS processes the Application.
                      8) INS issues the Alien Resident Receipt Card.


                      A question would be: Are the students residents as soon as they are allowed to file the I-130 or the I-140? No, they are simply eligible to be treated as permanent residents of the US at that point. Then the institution must look to see if they have been here at least 12 months for
                      purposes other than to go to school, and whether they have established a domicile in that state.
                      A student who has an I-130 receipt but who has not filed the I-485 qualify as a resident meets the requirement for being eligible to domicile.

                      High school students for whom a petition has been filed may be eligible to pay resident
                      tuition so long as they meet other statutory requirements.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Looks like even illegal immigrants may be able to enroll in public universities while paying in-state tuition; not all the states create this opportunity though...

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Federal, state, and institutional aid includes: Federal Perkins, Stafford and PLUS Loans, Federal Pell and SEOG Grants, Federal Work Study.

                          To be considered for federal, state, students must be at least one of the following:

                          ~ United States citizen (native-born or naturalized).
                          ~ U.S. national (includes natives of American Samoa or Swain's Island).
                          ~ U.S. permanent resident. Must have an I-151, I-551, or I-551C (Alien Registration Receipt Card), or a Passport or an I-94 Form with a stamp indicating I-551 status.
                          ~ Eligible Non-citizen with an INS Arrival-Departure Record (I-94) Form with one of the following designations:
                          # "Refugee"
                          # "Indefinite Parole" and/or "Humanitarian Parole"
                          # "Asylum Granted"
                          # "Cuban-Haitian Entrant, Status Pending,"
                          # "Conditional Entrant" (valid only if issued before 4/1/1980).
                          # Temporary Resident with an I-688 Card.

                          Students holding only the following Visas are NOT eligible for any federal, state, or institutional financial aid:

                          ~ Student Visas (F1 or F2).
                          ~ Exchange Visitor Visas (J1 or J2).
                          ~ G-Series Visas (international organizations).
                          ~ Non-citizens with only I-688A or I-688B Cards (persons with an EAD thanks to the Amnesty Progran)
                          ~ Non-citizens with only a Notice of Approval to Apply for Permanent Residence (I-171 or I-464) (Humanitarian Parolees)
                          ~ Non-citizens with only Family Unity Status (Form I-797) (Under the Voluntary Departure)

                          Comment



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