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  • Articles RSS Feed

    Published on 07-30-2012 03:38 PM

    Bloggings on Immigration Law

    by Roger Algase

    Jul 29, 2012

    Published on 07-30-2012 03:37 PM

    Bloggings on Political Asylum

    by Jason Dzubow

    Jul 27, 2012

    Published on 07-30-2012 03:34 PM

    Bloggings on Dysfunctional Government

    Angelo Paparelli

    July 30, 2012

    Published on 07-30-2012 03:33 PM

    ...
    Published on 07-27-2012 03:53 PM

    Bloggings on Immigration Law

    by Roger Algase

    The Republicans Favor An Elite Few Over Average People On Taxes. Would They Also Do The Same On Immigration?

    If there is one policy that the Republicans are identified with more than any other, it is their commitment never to raise taxes - ever - on anyone - by any means. So goes the Grover Norquist pledge. When Chief Justice John Roberts called the individual mandate in the ACA a "tax" in order to uphold President Obama's historic health care reform, the Republican propagandists had a field day, as we all know. And when Mitt Romney briefly stepped out of line to call the mandate something else instead of a tax, he was quickly whipped back in by no less than Rupert Murdoch himself, along with a chorus of other right wing king makers.

    So whatever other faults the Republicans may have on other issues, at least they will never, ever, raise taxes on anybody, right? Just read their lips. Actually it turns out that there is just a slight exception to their pledge. If you are not one of the wealthy few who would benefit the most from extending the George W. Bush tax cuts, which the Republicans are fighting tooth and nail to make permanent, but you are just an ordinary American who works for a living, then your payroll taxes will go up. 

    At least, this is according to a proposal by Republican Senator Orrin Hatch called ...

    Published on 07-27-2012 03:52 PM

    Bloggings on Immigration Law and Policy

    by Greg Siskind

    Baltimore Welcoming Immigrants in Hopes of Revitalizing City

    This is smart. From the Washington Post:

    After decades of seeing the city’s population slide with every census count, Baltimore officials are trying to turn things around. One key strategy is embracing immigrants, in the hope they will encourage friends and family to join them.

    Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake (D) has told Latinos, in particular, that she is counting on them to help Baltimore gain 10,000 families within a decade. As a first step, she signed

    Published on 07-27-2012 03:49 PM

    Bloggings on Deportation and Removal

    by Matthew Kolken

    Shocking Video Shows More than a Dozen Border Patrol Agents Beating a Helpless Mexican Immigrant to Death

     

    The video above documents a barbaric incident that occurred in May 2010. It reveals the vicious beating of a man that was encountered while attempting to reenter the United States without authorization so that he could be reunited with his five United States citizen children.

    The man, Anastasio Hernández Rojas, was 32-years-old at the time and did not survive the attack by Border ...

    Published on 07-27-2012 03:47 PM

    How To Respond To An RFE For A Regional Center Application

    by Joseph Whalen

    An interesting question came up in the July 26, 2012, EB-5 call with USCIS. Someone, I didn't catch the name, asked about dropping the problematic or insufficient portions (industry cluster/NAICS codes) from an I-924 in order to get quicker approval of the rest. ...

    Published on 07-27-2012 03:46 PM

    Canada's New Refugee System

    by Nolan Rappaport

    Background. Canada is a signatory to the 1951 United Nations Convention Relating to the Status of Refugees and its Protocol.[1] The Convention prohibits signatories from returning people to territories where they will face persecution on account of race, religion, nationality, membership in a particular social group or political opinion. Canada also is signatory to the United Nations Convention against Torture and Other Cruel, Inhuman or Degrading Treatment or Punishment.[2]

    Canada welcomes one out of every ten resettled United Nations Convention refugees worldwide. This is more, per capita, than any other country, the second most in absolute terms after the United States.[3] By 2013, Canada expects to be resettling as many as 14,500 refugees a year. [4]

    Comments. The ceiling for refugee admissions to the United States was 80,000 for FY 2011.[5] The United States aims to consider for resettlement at least half of the refugees referred by the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees for resettlement worldwide each year, depending on the availability of funding.
    Rick Dykstra (Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Citizenship and Immigration). In 2011, Canada received 5,800 refugee claims from nationals of democratic, rights-respecting member countries of the European Union. Virtually all of these claims were abandoned, withdrawn or rejected. These bogus claimants come here to exploit Canada's generous asylum system, which includes expensive taxpayer-funded health care, welfare and other social benefits. The cost to Canadian taxpayers for these unfounded claims is at least $170 million per year. [6]

    Enactment of the Protecting Canada's Immigration System Act. On June 29, 2012, the Canadian Minister of Citizenship, Immigration and Multiculturalism,[7] Jason Kenney,[8] welcomed the final passage and royal assent of the Protecting Canada's Immigration System Act.[9] According to Minister Kenney, it will establish faster protection for those who genuinely need it by reducing the time it takes to review and decide a refugee claim, faster removal of those who do not really need protection, and limited access to appeal mechanisms for failed refugee claimants who come from generally non-refugee producing countries. Between the reforms of the Balanced Refugee Reform Act [10] and the Protecting Canada's Immigration System Act, the provinces and territories are expected to save somewhere in the range of $1.65 billion over five years in social assistance and education costs. [11]

    Overview of Canada's New Refugee System

    In an effort to make the refugee system faster and fairer, the new system establishes differentiation between groups of refugee claimants. This includes the following groups of claimants who will receive expedited processing:

    • Claimants from designated countries of origin. Nationals from countries designated by the Minister of Citizenship and Immigration for having low refugee claim success rates.
    • Claimants whose claims are manifestly unfounded. Foreign nationals whose claims for protection were rejected by the Refugee Protection Division because they were clearly fraudulent.
    • Claimants whose claims have no credible basis. Foreign nationals whose claims for protection were rejected by the Refugee Protection Division because there was no credible or trustworthy evidence on which the claim could have been accepted.
    Comments. The United States does not treat all persecution claimants the same way either. United States Customs and Border Protection ...
    Published on 07-27-2012 03:43 PM

    ILW's Consular Posts Book and AILA's Consular Practice Handbook. One Is Genuine, The Other Genuinely Disappointing

    by Anthony Guidice

    My wife and I were shopping for shoes one day. She walks over to me with a pair of black slip-ons. They're on sale, she says, and they're her size; but they feel a little tight. "They'll probably loosen up as I wear them," she says. Luckily, she always listens to me about clothes. "Probably not," I say. "Is there anything similar that fits?" She takes me over to a full-priced pair from a name-brand manufacturer. These are nicer, a little simpler design, and the leather is softer. "How do you like these?" "Oh, I love them," she says, "and they fit fine, but they cost three times as much."

    I told her to get the expensive pair. If she buys the sale item, she'll wear them maybe three or four times at the most. They'll pinch and hurt, and after the brief glow of the cheap price dims, she'll put them in the closet. They'll sit there for about five years, and then she'll throw them away. However much she pays for them, she's paying a lot of money for a lousy pair of shoes. But, if she buys the quality item that fits well, she may wear them two or three times a week - for years. For the number of times she wears them, their eventual cost will be pennies.

    So it is with The Consular Posts Book from ILW. At $499 it's not "cheap" but the cost is low. You'll use the ILW book and it will help you practice law. It's full of concrete and specific practice tools. If you specialize in Immigration ...

    Published on 07-26-2012 02:41 PM

    Bloggings on Immigration Law

    Roger Algase

    Jul 26, 2012

    Published on 07-26-2012 02:40 PM

    Bloggings on Nurse and Allied Health Immigration

    Chris Musillo

    July 26, 2012


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