This comment is a continuation of my updated comment which originally appeared in the January 10 issue of Immigration Daily. See:

discuss.ilw.com/blogs/immigrationlawblogs/392592

In an update to that initial comment, I discussed reports that the Trump administration is planning a dramatic expansion of the current Muslim ban order, which now prohibits about 200 million people from five almost 99 percent Muslim countries from even applying for legal visas to the US.

I also referred to a news item reporting that Texas governor Greg Abbot, a Republican, has made his state the first one in the nation to use authority conferred by a recent Trump executive order allowing individual states to ban resettlement of legal refugees upon their admission to the U.S.

Links to the news reports relating to those two new developments are also included in my above updated January 10 comment.

These two news stories show that hatred against non-white legal immigrants is in full swing in Donald Trump's White House and his party, and that it is already becoming the centerpiece of their 2020 election campaign.

The reported moves to widen the Muslim Ban and to block legal refugees, whose admission numbers are already at a historic low due to the actions of Trump (and Stephen Miller, who reportedly wanted to set FY 2020 refugee admissions as zero (!), are also part of a wider Trump administration campaign against all non-European legal immigrants,

These include highly skilled and educated H-1B, L-1 and other business and professional immigrants, many of whom are from India and China rather than Europe, as well as legal family-based and Diversity immigrants. Most of these immigrants are from what Trump calls "shithole" countries, rather than the "Countries like Norway" which he in on recod as stating that he prefers, according to reports about a White House meeting on January 18, 2018, almost exactly two years ago.

With regard to Trump's reported plans to expand the Muslim ban to as many as seven additional mainly Muslim countries, the fact that the media euphemistically and misleadingly calls this a "travel" ban instead of a specific attack on Muslims based on their religion (as the Supreme Court, in Trump v. Hawaii deliberately turned a blind eye and deaf ear to Trump's record of openly Islamophobic campaign statements) cannot change the reality that the real reason for the ban was to exploit hatred against a targeted minority group, not the obviously concocted "national security" fig leaf which the Supreme Court's Republican majority was so eager to accept in the face of overwhelming evidence to the contrary.

See, Brennan Center for Justice, October, 2018:

Trump's Trav
el Ban is Still Unconstitutional

https://www.brennancenter.org/our-work/analysis-opinion/trumps-travel-ban-still-unconstitutional

See also: CATO Institute: (August 14, 2017)


A Dozen Times Trump Equated his Travel Ban With a Muslim Ban

(I am sorry - I do not have a link to this important article - please access through Google.)

The above articles show the history of the Muslim Ban in detail, beginning with Trump's initial call for a world wide ban on entry to the US by all people belonging to the Muslim religion, including legal green card holders and even at one point US citizens; up to the final "watered-down" version of the ban which Trump berated his own Department of Justice for proposing, in order to get it past the Supreme Court's Republican majority.

It now appears from the latest reports that Trump is trying to make up for lost time - and lost hate - in time for the 2020 election.

As for Texas governor Greg Abbot's refusal to allow up to 16,000 legally admitted refugees, a tiny number of people compared to his state's total population - to resettle in his state, this example of open bigotry against nonwhite immigrants is beyond despicable.

But this shows that Trump's immigration white supremacy did not just pop up out of nowhere. It has been part of the Republican agenda, for at least the past two decades, going back to IIRIRA - enacted by a Republican-controlled Congress without debate or discussion - if not all the way back to GOP opposition to the landmark 1965 immigration reform law itself.

Hatred of non-white immigrants, both legal and unauthorized, is clearly in the driver's seat for this fall's election, as far as Donald Trump and his party are concerned



Roger Algase
Attorney at Law