The following comment has been expanded and updated as of July 9 at 8:59 am:

Every president leaves behind a legacy, or at least is remembered for one or a very few things in particular.

Donald Trump seems to be doing everything possible to make sure that, more than any other president in our history (since he did not start this travesty, but is instead putting previous abuses on steroids) he will be remembered, not only as the president who was so obsessed with keeping Hispanic and other non-white immigrants out of the United States that he tore more than 2,000 young children from their parents and put them in shackles, cages, empty office buildings and desert tents, but the president who forced one-year old children to bone up on US immigration law sufficiently to be able to defend themselves before judges in deportation hearings.

And, as thinkprogress.org reports, his administration is doing so after, in many cases, the parents of the children involved have already agreed to accept deportation after being lied to by DHS officers who told them that once deported, they would be reunited with their children. It now appears that many of these deported Central American parents might never be reunited with or see their children again.

https://thinkprogress.org/migrant-to...-8474ea86129d/

The above horrifying report raises a perfectly legitimate question as to whether "removal hearings" under the above conditions deserve to be called judicial or legal proceedings at all, at least as these have been understood during the 5,000 years during which proceedings under the name of law have been recorded throughout human history, beginning with ancient Egypt and Babylonia

https://www.britannica.com/topic/cuneiform-law

or whether America's current immigration court proceedings involving young children should more properly be called a crime against humanity, as a June 23 article in the Harvard Crimson suggests. See:

Should We Send Trump to the Hague?


https://www.thecrimson.com/column/af...rump-to-hague/

For more about the ramifications of Trump's child separation policy, which has now been officially cancelled, but which is still causing what may be irreparable damage to many Central American and other non-white immigrant children and their families, see The Guardian, June 5:

https://www.theguardian.com/us-news/...n-from-parents

I will leave it to Donald Trump. Jeff Sessions and Stephen Miller, the architects of this regime's immigration agenda, to answer this question.

However, while they are figuring this out, it is also important to note that these terrible abuses, this cruel mockery of any concept that has ever gone under the name of Rule of Law, are not isolated policy decisions. They are part of a larger picture of a president, and his administration, who are determined to roll back a half century of progress toward racial justice and equal opportunity for immigrants to America from all parts of the world, not just white Europe, as was the case under the openly bigoted 1924 "Nordics-only" national origins immigration act which Sessions had such high praise for in his immigration "Handbook" for Congressional Republicans authored in January, 2015, only three and a half years ago.

The crying, screaming babies and other terrified young children who are being dragged into immigration court after being torn away from parents whom they might never see again and told by the Trump regime that they have to represent themselves in front of often confused immigration judges, who could never have imagined while they were in law school that they would ever have to preside over such a travesty, are only part of a larger picture.

This larger picture also includes potentially hundreds of thousands, if not millions, of other immigrant families who are facing the prospect of being split up by Trumps' assault on legal immigration from countries which are "not like Norway" - his attempt to abolish extended family immigration and the Diversity Visa; his revocation of TPS for hundreds of thousands of immigrants who have been living in America peacefully and productively for many years but lack the president's essential immigration requirement of having a light-colored skin; his DACA cancellation; his Muslim Ban which has just been upheld by a Supreme Court which is now on the point of becoming even more right wing and authoritarian as we speak; and even Trump's hypocritical attempts to make employment-based H-1B and other legal visas and green cards much more difficult - unless, of course, the sponsored immigrants happen to be working at Mar-a-Lago.

And the crying, screaming devastated young children who are now being dragged into immigration court without parents, without lawyers (in many cases) and without the faintest idea of what is going on or ability to stand up for themselves, are only the beginning of a movement which, based on Trump's campaign statements and those of many of the anti-immigrant zealots who helped him gain the presidency despite losing the popular vote to Hillary Clinton by almost 3 million votes, could very soon lead to millions of American-born children - and adults, losing their birthright US citizenship - again for having the "wrong" skin color.

https://www.cnn.com/2018/04/18/polit...nia/index.html

When this happens, as it very likely will begin to if Trump survives the Mueller investigation into his assorted alleged scandals, and especially if he wins another term (or, not inconceivably, becomes president for life under our fragile and easily overturned constitution), the screaming babies now being hauled into his deportation courts will very possibly not be the only brown-skinned people in America who may have quite a lot to cry about.
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Roger Algase is a New York immigration lawyer and a graduate of Harvard College and Harvard Law School. For more than 35 years, Roger has been helping mainly skilled and professional immigrants obtain work visas and green cards. His practice is focused on work visas through specialty occupation (H-1B) and extraordinary ability (O-1), as well as green cards through labor certification and through marriage or other family relationships.

Roger also writes about immigration law from the standpoint of racial equality, equal justice before the law and fundamental human rights, all of which are now under unprecedented attack. His email address is
algaselex@gmail.com