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Democratic demands for passage of a DREAM Act threatened to prevent passage of a funding bill needed to prevent a partial shutdown of the government. But the Republicans were able to pass a stopgap spending bill on December 21, 2017, which postponed the showdown on this issue until January.

The DREAM Act would provide conditional permanent resident status for aliens whose parents brought them to the United States illegally when they were children.

President Obama established a program of Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) to give them temporary lawful status.

Trump terminated DACA on September 5, 2017, subject to a 6-month grace period. The Democrats and some Republicans are trying to get a DREAM Act passed before the grace period expires.

But they have been trying unsuccessfully to get a DREAM Act passed for 16 years, and their attempt to pass the DREAM Act of 2017, is likely to be unsuccessful too.

The Senate version was introduced on July 20, 2017, and an identical House version was introduced on July 26, 2017. Congress has not held a hearing or a markup on either bill.

If enacted, it would require the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) to grant conditional lawful permanent resident status to undocumented aliens who:

  1. Have been continuously physically present in the United States for four years preceding this bill's enactment;
  2. Were younger than 18 years of age when they entered the United States;
  3. Are not inadmissible on criminal, security, terrorism, or other grounds;
  4. Have not participated in persecution; and
  5. Have not been convicted of specified federal or state offenses; and
  6. Have fulfilled educational requirements.



And DHS would be required to grant conditional permanent resident status to aliens who have had DACA status.

It exempts grants of conditional permanent resident status from all numerical limitations.

Read more at http://thehill.com/opinion/immigrati...s-just-a-dream

About author. Nolan Rappaport was detailed to the House Judiciary Committee as an executive branch immigration law expert for three years; he subsequently served as an immigration counsel for the Subcommittee on Immigration, Border Security and Claims for four years. Prior to working on the Judiciary Committee, he wrote decisions for the Board of Immigration Appeals for 20 years.