The Washington Post reports that Donald Trump has terminated a 20-year White House policy of hosting a dinner to celebrate the Eid, ending the Muslim fasting month of Ramadan, and has issued a short, perfunctory statement marking this important Muslim holiday instead.

http://www.houstonchronicle.com/news...g-11244746.php

Holding a White House dinner to celebrate this event dates from the time of President Thomas Jefferson, and had been revived under Presidents Clinton, Bush and Obama.

While of course, the current president has no legal or other obligation to mark this celebration, canceling this event can be read as one more indication that this president does not feel a great deal of empathy or respect for Americans who practice this particular faith.

There can be little doubt that the president, by cancelling the Eid celebration, intended to send the 3 or 4 million American citizens and permanent residents who practice this religion a clear message about his own personal feelings toward all people who belong to this religious group, not just to citizens of the six countries on his latest entry ban list.

Could this be additional evidence for the Supreme Court and/or other federal courts to consider of what the Fourth Circuit Court of Appeals determined was Trump's clear pattern of "animus" and religious discrimination in general against Muslims as the real motive for his entry ban orders?

It would not be unreasonable for the courts to reach such a conclusion.

While extending best wishes to all Muslims for this holiday, it is important to bear in mind that their struggle against religious prejudice and discrimination in America, including but not limited to immigration policy, but also including an appalling increase in anti-Muslim hate crimes in this country (and the U.K.) which our nation's 45th President has done little or nothing to speak out against, is a struggle for justice and equality on behalf of Jews, Christians and all the diverse people of America, regardless of religious affiliation or lack of same.

As Rabbi Burton L. Visotzky of the Jewish Theological Seminary in New York, and Reverend Bertram Johnson of New York's Riverside Church, two of America's best known and most respected religious organizations, wrote recently in The Hill:

Jews and Christians must oppose Trump's 'Muslim ban'. Again.

http://thehill.com/blogs/pundits-blo...slim-ban-again

Roger Algase
Attorney at Law