The Washington Post reports on March 29 that a Glasgow, Scotland shopkeeper and Pakistani Immigrant, Asad Shah, was killed by another Muslim who allegedly drove 200 miles to murder him after Shah sent Easter Greetings to his Christian friends, neighbors and customers. According to the WP story, Shah was known and loved by everyone in his neighborhood as a man who respected and cared about everyone regardless of religion.

One of the vigils in his honor was attended by the Scottish first minister. Shah belonged to the community of Ahmadiyyah Muslims, who are known for their tolerance and acceptance toward other religions. The WP reports that the majority Sunni Muslims, to whom his alleged killer belongs, consider the Ahmadiyyah Muslims as heretical.

Certainly, no one in his right mind would want to let the alleged killer into the United States, and there will no doubt be questions about how he was allowed into the UK (if he was not born there). Obviously, tighter background checks to weed out potential killers and terrorists are needed.

But Donald Trump would also have banned Asad Shah, who gave his life for the ideal of religious tolerance, from entering the US, merely because he was also a Muslim, despite the fact that most victims of killings and atrocities by ISIS and other Muslim extremists have also been Muslims. Is this what America really stands for?

(I do not have a link to the WP story - please check out their March 29 home page.)
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Roger Algase is a New York immigration lawyer and a graduate of Harvard College and Harvard Law School. For more than 35 years, he has been helping mainly skilled and professional immigrants from many different parts of the world obtain work visas and green cards.

Roger believes that tolerating or promoting prejudice against or denial of basic rights to any group of immigrants on racial or religious grounds puts the freedoms of all Americans, and the foundations of our democracy itself, in danger. His email address is algaselex@gmail.com

Roger Algase
Attorney at Law