By: Bruce Buchanan, Sebelist Buchanan Law

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The Immigrant and Employee Rights Section (IER) of the Department of Justice has reached a settlement with InMotion Software LLC (InMotion), a software developer and recruiter in Texas, resolving their investigation into whether the company violated the Immigration and Nationality Act’s (INA) anti-discrimination provision.

Based on its investigation, the IER concluded InMotion retaliated against a work-authorized job applicant (Charging Party) after she protested InMotion’s requirement that she provides a Permanent Resident Card (green card) even though she had a valid employment authorization card issued by the USCIS. After the Charging Party complained that InMotion’s request constituted discrimination under the INA, InMotion removed her from its pool of candidates available for job placement. The INA’s anti-discrimination provision prohibits employers from retaliating against or intimidating workers because they have opposed employer conduct that may violate that provision or have participated in the IER’s activities to enforce it.

Under the settlement agreement, InMotion will pay $3621, the maximum civil penalty for an instance of retaliation, to the U.S. government, remove any references to the investigation or settlement from the Charging Party’s personnel file, post notices informing workers about their rights under the INA’s anti-discrimination provision, provide all newly hired employees with a Lists of Acceptable Documents to provide with the I-9 form, train its staff, and be subject to departmental monitoring and reporting requirements for one year.

Companies need to be aware of the laws relating to retaliation if an employee files an anti-discrimination claim or alleges such discrimination. For the answers to these issues and many others related to employer immigration compliance, I invite you to read my new book, The I-9 and E-Verify Handbook, which is available at http://www.amazon.com/dp/0997083379.