An Ohio grand jury returned a 23-count indictment charging six people for their roles in a conspiracy to hire undocumented workers at a chain of restaurants in Ohio, called “Mariachi Locos” and “Mariachi Cocos” and pay them less than minimum wage. Prosecutors are also seeking for defendants to forfeit more than $16 million generated by the restaurants.

According to the indictment, the defendants engaged in the practice of hiring undocumented workers who were illegally present in the United States and conspired to shield these workers from detection by paying them in cash, excluding them from payrolls, leasing housing for the workers, and aiding the workers in obtaining fraudulent work documentation.

Prosecutors allege the defendants’ employment practices enabled them to enrich themselves because they paid the undocumented workers less than minimum wage, and did not pay the workers for overtime hours worked.

The charges include harboring undocumented workers, conspiracy to harbor undocumented workers, aiding and abetting the harboring of undocumented workers, mail fraud, and conspiracy to commit mail fraud. Two defendants are also charged with making false statements to federal law enforcement officers.

This indictment is just one more example of the high cost of committing employment-related immigration violations, especially when it involves harboring undocumented workers.